Certification of products and organisations

Applications for product certification/validation of foreign certificates

Application process

How do I apply for a certificate/approval?

APPLICANT PORTAL

If you are an applicant from one of the EASA member states, the US and Canada, online submission of your application via the Applicant Portal is now the preferred method for receiving your application. The Applicant Portal offers numerous benefits: 

- Simplifies applying for certification tasks - saving time and effort
- Enables viewing and monitoring the status of applications 
- Allows applicants to manage their own contact details and user credentials
- Reduces administrative transactions 
- Improves data quality due to integration with a centralised list for aeronautical products

The following applications are covered by the Applicant Portal:

  • Major Change
  • Major Repair
  • Derivative
  • Minor Change (including Minor Change to STC)
  • Minor Repair
  • Supplemental Type Certificate – Initial
  • Supplemental Type Certificate – Major Change
  • ETSOA – Initial
  • ETSOA – Minor Change

Further applications will be introduced to the Applicant Portal in the future.

If you wish to register to use the EASA Applicant Portal please send an email to Applicant [dot] Portal [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
Please inform us if you wish to receive further information or a demonstration of the portal.

In case of questions and technical issues, please contact: Applicant [dot] Portal [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu.

The use of the Applicant Portal has been introduced to other non-EASA Member State applicants. Please contact applicant [dot] portal [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu for further information.

Note: The use of the Applicant Portal for applications concerning Major Change/Repair, Derivate, Minor Change/Repair, STC and ETSO will soon become mandatory

View list of EASA Member States

Application forms
For applications that are not yet covered by the Applicant Portal and for applicants who are not yet registered with the Applicant Portal, please download from the EASA website the application form you need. Depending on your application, please send it to the email address indicated on the last page of the application form:

TC [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
MajorChange-MajorRepair [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
MinorChange-MinorRepair [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
STC [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
etsoa [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
AFMchange [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
CertificateTransfer [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
Validation [dot] Support [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
flightconditions [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu

 

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I would like to revise my application submitted through the Applicant Portal. What do I have to do?

Currently, the feature for editing or revising an already submitted application in the Applicant Portal is still being developed. In the meantime, if you wish to make any amendments, please contact EASA by sending an email to new [dot] applications [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu quoting the EASA request or project number. Upon receipt we will update our database accordingly.

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I have submitted my application, what happens next?

Users of the Applicant Portal will instantly receive an acknowledgement email containing the request number as soon as the application has been submitted over the Applicant Portal.
For submissions of applications via email and provided that the application is complete, we will acknowledge receipt within two working days and provide you with the EASA project number.

As soon as your project has been allocated either to an EASA PCM or externally, you will receive the EASA Acceptance Letter providing you with the contact details of the PCM. The technical investigation may begin. Below please find the administrative milestones for your application:

 

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I am applying from a non-EASA Member State, what requirements are there?

A Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA) exists between EASA and the USA, Canada and Brazil and aims at the mutual acceptance of certificates.

As per the Technical Implementation Procedure (TIP) with the FAA (US) and TCCA (Canada), applicants applying to EASA have to submit their EASA application via their local FAA/TCCA office and request that their application be forwarded to EASA. The FAA/TCCA will forward the complete application package to EASA together with the FAA/TCCA concurrence letter. Applications that have not been forwarded via the FAA or the TCCA are considered incomplete and cannot be registered.

For further information on the TIP - FAA, click here.
For further information on the TIP - TCCA, click here.
For further information on the TIP - Brazil, click here.

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I am a US applicant, what are the benefits of the recent TIP revision 6?

Please note that TIP revision 6 has been published, please click here

This Revision of the TIP is the first milestone of the implementation of the validation improvement roadmap signed between EASA and FAA in February 2016. All design changes now have common approval path:

  • Accepted (The approval or certificate issued by the certifying authority are automatically accepted by the validating authority)
  • Streamlined validation (Basic) (The validating authority issues its certificate on the basis of the certificate issued by the certifying authority without technical involvement)
  • Technical Validation (non-Basic) (The technical validation is performed by the validating authority according to a work plan focused on safety emphasis items)

This revision extends to all repair design their acceptance by the validating authority, removes the last restrictions to the acceptance of ETSO/TSO approvals and introduces the concept of Basic Type Certificates (limited to piston engines and propellers). It will enter into force 6 months after its signature on 22 September 2017 in order to train EASA and FAA personnel.

 

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I am a BASA applicant (US/CAN/BRAZIL), how do I use the EASA Applicant Portal?

The bilateral applicant will complete the application data in the Applicant Portal and press “Submit”.

The Applicant Portal will send an email to the applicant with the application data summary document (Application Acknowledgement, FO.APMAN.00046) attached to it.

The applicant forwards the document to their National Aviation Authority in lieu of a completed EASA application form.

Meanwhile, EASA will change the application status in the Applicant Portal to “Waiting for FWD Letter – Eligibility Check” .

The National Aviation Authority reviews the application and forwards it together with the forwarding letter to EASA.

EASA performs the full eligibility check and, if applicable, changes the application status in the Applicant Portal to “Registered”. 

The technical checks and investigation can start upon formal EASA acceptance.

 

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Can a US applicant use the EASA Applicant Portal?

The US applicant can indeed submit the application online to EASA via the portal. 

An online application document is then generated, which replaces the current application forms as you know them.

In order to stay in line with the bilateral procedures, the US applicant will send the online application document together with the requested data for the validation request to the responsible FAA ACO which will forward the complete validation request to EASA along with the FAA concurrence letter. 

EASA ensures that only once the FAA letter is received along with the application summary document and the requested data for the validation request, EASA will further proceed with the application registration. 
The EASA Applicant Portal simply logs the application, which is held pending until the FAA has reviewed the application and provided EASA with a concurrence letter. It is not required for US applicants to upload supporting documents for the validation request to the EASA Applicant Portal.

The EASA Applicant Portal is currently set up to only provide the applicant with an acknowledgement message, not the FAA. As can be seen in the illustration, it is incumbent on the US applicant to actually notify the responsible FAA ACO of their EASA application by providing the online application document to the FAA. Once notified by the applicant themselves, FAA can initiate the review of their submission and only then can the FAA provide EASA with the required concurrence letter.

Once EASA receives the FAA concurrence letter, which confirms that the FAA has conducted their review of the application, only then will EASA perform their full eligibility check of the application, and once eligible, the EASA task number is assigned and the technical checks and investigation will start.

For further information, please consult the extensive EASA Portal user guide

The purpose of this message is to clarify to FAA certification staff and US applicants the use of the new EASA Applicant Portal

The new EASA portal is an alternative to the previous procedure of having to use MS-Word forms when submitting applications for design approval to EASA.

Applicants can easily register to the EASA Applicant Portal by sending a simple email to Applicant [dot] Portal [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu.

Please find below an explanatory note on how the submittal process for US applicants works in order to stay in line with TIP procedures:

While the MS-Word forms are still acceptable, online submittal of applications over the Applicant Portal is now the preferred method by EASA for receiving applications.

The overall application process to EASA under the TIP remains essentially the same.

 

 

 

 

 

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Can a Canadian applicant use the EASA Applicant Portal?

The new EASA portal was introduced under TIP Rev. 2. It is an alternative to the previous procedure of having to use MS-Word forms when submitting applications for design approval to EASA. The applicable TIP provision citing use of the Application portal is provided below:

2.3.1 Submission of an Application
(a)………..

(i) For EASA: Application Forms

Questions have been raised, suggesting the new on-line portal deviates from the TIP procedures that requires TCCA office submit the application to EASA. Use of the new EASA Application portal puts the applicant directly “submitting” an application before TCCA has the chance to review and endorse such application.

You will find below an illustration explaining the process and sequence of the new portal. The use of the new portal (which is an on-line application) replaces the previous filling of MS-Word form. Once the on-line application is filed, the Canadian applicant will receive an acknowledgement message that an application has been filled. This on-line application will not be processed yet nor validated outright. It simply logs it, and is held pending until such time TCCA has reviewed the application and provided EASA with a forwarding letter.

The EASA Applicant Portal is currently set up to provide the applicant only with an acknowledgement message, and not the TCCA. As can be seen in the illustration, it is incumbent on the Canadian applicant to actually notify TCCA of their EASA application by providing the Applicant Data Summary (FO.APMAN.00046) to TCCA. Once notified by the applicant themselves, TCCA can initiate the review of their submission and only then can TCCA provide EASA with the required forwarding letter.

Once EASA receives the TCCA forwarding letter, which confirms TCCA has conducted their review of the application, only then will EASA perform their full eligibility check of the application, and once eligible the EASA task number is assigned and the technical checks and investigation started.

The EASA Portal guide can be accessed at the following link: EASA Portal guide

If a Canadian applicant elects to use the MS-Word forms, the forms cannot be electronically submitted via the portal. The MS-Word forms have to be filled by the applicant and a copy submitted to TCCA, who in turn will file the application to EASA. While the MS-Word Forms are still acceptable, EASA prefers the transition to using the on-line application portal due to the efficiencies brought to the process (drop down boxes ensure the correctness of Applicant information, EASA product list, etc.).

The new Applicant Portal requires our applicant to notify TCCA that they have filed an application to EASA that without such notification, their application will not be processed further by EASA.
The overall application process to EASA under the TIP remains essentially the same.

 

 

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Am I eligible to apply for a Major Change or Minor/Major Change to STC?

Major Change approvals can only be applied for by the Type Certificate holder.

For minor or major changes to an existing STC only the STC holder is eligible to apply (EASA FO.CERT.00031 and FO.CERT.00032).
Alternatively, you may apply for your own STC using EASA form FO.CERT.00033 but need to demonstrate part 21 eligibility i.e. be a Design Organisation Approval holder if you are an EASA Member State applicant. Alternatively, you may contact a DOA of your choice.
Part 21.A.14(c) provides the possibility for any natural person to apply for an STC on an ELA 1 aircraft by demonstrating capability through a certification programme. Alternative procedures are not necessary. ELA 1 is generally defined as aircraft with a max MTOW of 1200kg or less, including balloons up to 3400m^3 and sailplanes.

ELA1
ELA1 aircraft’ means the following manned European Light Aircraft:
ELA2
ELA2 aircraft’ means the following manned European Light Aircraft:

an aeroplane with a Maximum Take-off Mass (MTOM) of 1 200 kg or less that is not classified as complex motor-powered aircraft

an aeroplane with a Maximum Take-off Mass (MTOM) of 2 000 kg or less that is not classified as complex motor-powered aircraft

a sailplane or powered sailplane of 1 200 kg MTOM or less

a sailplane or powered sailplane of 2 000 kg MTOM or less

a balloon with a maximum design lifting gas or hot air volume of not more than 3 400 m 3 for hot air balloons, 1 050 m 3 for gas balloons, 300 m 3 for tethered gas balloons

a balloon

an airship designed for not more than 4 occupants and a maximum design lifting gas or hot air volume of not more than 3 400 m 3 for hot air airships and 1 000 m 3 for gas airships6

a hot air airship

 

a gas airship complying with all of the following characteristics: 

- 3% maximum static heaviness

- Non-vectored thrust (except reverse thrust)

- Conventional and simple design of: structure, control system and ballonet system

- Non-power assisted controls

 

a Very Light Rotorcraft

 

Certification Programme
Demonstration of capability via a certification programme for:
AP DOA
Demonstration of capability via AP DOA for:

ELA1 aircraft

ELA2 aircraft

Engine [to be] installed in ELA1 aircraft

Engine [to be] installed in ELA2 aircraft

Propeller [to be] installed in ELA1 aircraft

Propeller [to be] installed in ELA2 aircraft

Piston Engine

Fixed or adjustable pitch propeller 

Non-EU applicants do not need to demonstrate part 21 eligibility if a Bilateral Agreement/Working Arrangement is in force. 

For further information on Design Organisation Approval (DOA) and Alternative Procedure for Design Organisation Approval (AP DOA), please refer to the following FAQs.

 

 

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Approval process

What is the status of my project?

If you wish to enquire about the status of your project, please contact directly your project certification manager (PCM) by quoting the EASA project number. The contact details of the PCM are sent to you with the EASA Acceptance Letter once your project has been allocated.

Alternatively you may send an email to new [dot] applications [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu

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My project is re-classified, what implications are there?

Fees & charges category re-classification

Your project may be reclassified to a higher or lower category, e.g. from Simple to Standard, based on certain criteria that are defined in Commission Regulation (EU) No 319/2014. As a re-classification to a higher category leads to a higher fee, we will contact you first for your acceptance before taking any further action.

In case of re-classifications to a lower category, a credit note will be issued, if applicable.

For further information on the different fees & charges categories, please consult the tables sorted by application type provided in the Annex of the fees and charges regulation Commission Regulation (EU) No 319/2014

 

Simple

Standard

Complex

EASA Supplemental Type Certificate (STC)

 

EASA major design changes

 

EASA major repairs

STC, major design change, or repair, only involving current and well-proven justification methods, for which a complete set of data (description, compliance check-list and compliance documents) can be communicated at time of application, 

and for which the applicant has demonstrated experience, 

and which can be assessed by the project certification manager alone, or with a limited involvement of a single discipline specialist.

All other STC, major design changes or repairs.

Significant (*) STC or major design change.

Validated US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) STC

Basic (**)

Non-basic

Significant non-basic

Validated FAA major design change

Level 2 (**) major design changes when not automatically accepted. (***)

Level 1 (**)

Significant level 1

Validated FAA major repair

N/A

(automatic acceptance)

Repairs on critical component (**)

N/A

(*) "Significant" is defined in paragraph 21.A.101 (b) of the Annex to Regulation (EU) No. 748/2012 (and similarly in FAA 14CFR 21.101 (b)) as amended.

(**) For the definitions of "basic", “non-basic”, "level 1", "level 2", "critical component" and “Certificating Authority”, see the applicable bilateral agreement under which the validation takes place.

(***) Automatic acceptance criteria by EASA for level 2 major changes are defined in the applicable bilateral agreement under which the validation takes place.

Part 21 re-classification

Your application may be reclassified to a different application type, e.g. from Minor Change to Major Change based on certain technical criteria that are defined in Part 21. In this case a new application must be made to EASA.

 

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I would like to cancel, interrupt or re-activate my project; what do I need to do?

Cancellation
You may cancel your project at any time by completing form FO.APMAN.00143 or by sending an email to new [dot] applications [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu quoting the EASA task number. We will confirm and, if applicable, proceed with any accounting adjustments.

Users of the Applicant Portal may cancel their application directly in the tool. 

Interruption
To interrupt a project, please complete form FO.APMAN.00143.
- An application may only be interrupted once, for a period not exceeding 18 months following the initial request to interrupt. 
- If the initial request was for 6 or 12 months, the interruption may be extended to the total of 18 months.
- The application validity is not impacted by the interruption. 
- An application cannot be interrupted retroactively. Any interruption period starts with the receipt of the request at EASA.

Re-activation
- EASA will automatically re-activate the application at the end of the interruption period – the applicant does not need to re-submit a new application to re-activate.
- Should the applicant wish to re-activate the project prior to the end of the requested interruption period, a request for early re-activation shall be submitted using form FO.APMAN.00143.

Fees and Charges
- The fee of an application interrupted within the first year since the application receipt shall not be reimbursed.
- Applications interrupted after the first year shall attract a cancellation fee (crediting of the flat fee and billing of actually performed hours - (Art. 9.3 of Commission Regulation (EU) 319/2014) 
- A re-activated application shall trigger a new initial fee (Art. 9.3 of Commission Regulation (EU) 319/2014)

Form FO.APMAN.00143 can be downloaded here.

If you have any invoicing related queries, please contact our Invoicing Section at query [dot] feesandcharges [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu

For further information on the termination or interruption of your project, please refer to Article 9 of our fees and charges regulation Commission Regulation (EU) No 319/2014.

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Supplemental Type Certificates (STC)

Where can I find a list of Supplemental Type Certificates (STC) approved by EASA?

EASA publishes a list of its approved STCs on the EASA website.

The EASA STC list compiles Supplemental Type Certificates issued by EASA since 03/06/2004 and is updated on a weekly basis.

STCs issued before this date or grandfathered STCs are not included in the list.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Why can't I find an STC on the EASA STC List?

The Agency applies its best efforts to ensure completeness of this list.

The EASA STC list compiles Supplemental Type Certificates issued by EASA since 03/06/2004. All EASA STCs are published except:

  • 'Grandfathered' STCs issued by the EU Member States prior to 29/09/2003.
  • STCs issued by Switzerland (FOCA) prior to 2007
  • Recently issued STCs may not yet appear on the list

Should you discover missing data or for any other question, we kindly request you to contact the following mailbox STC [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu

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What are grandfathered approvals?

Any STC approved or validated by an EASA member state before the establishment of EASA is deemed to be approved under Regulation (EC) No 1702/2003 Article 2a. This covers all previous approvals from Minor Changes to Major Changes, STCs and complete aircraft, both certifications and validations with the exception of products of the former Soviet Union. It also covers the Flight Conditions approved for aircraft operating under national Permits to Fly issued before 28 March 2007.

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How do I know whether an STC has been grandfathered?

Any STC approved or validated by an EU member state before the establishment of EASA is deemed to be 'grandfathered' under Regulation 1702/2003 Article 2 (3)(a). Unfortunately, a central repository of such approvals does not yet exist. Please contact the STC holder directly or review the websites of our member state’s national aviation authorities.

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How do I know whether an FAA / TCCA STC has been validated by EASA?

An STC can be considered to be EASA approved if it satisfies one of the 2 following conditions:

  1. It has been validated by EASA after the 27 September 2003 (ref. Regulation 1702/2003). In this case, the corresponding validated STC should be published on the EASA website.
  2. It has been validated by an EASA member state before the 28 September 2003. The Agency does not currently hold a record of all STCs that have been validated by local European National Aviation Authorities before the 28 September 2003.

In any case and in order to verify whether a foreign STC can be considered EASA approved, we suggest that you contact the STC holder.

Should you require the EASA validation of a foreign STC, which does not fulfil any of the two conditions above, please request the STC holder to apply using EASA form FO.CERT.00033 available on the EASA website. Alternatively, you may apply for your own STC using EASA form FO.CERT.00033 but need to demonstrate part 21 eligibility i.e. be a Design Organisation Approval holder if you are an EASA Member State applicant. Alternatively, you may contact a DOA of your choice. If you require further guidance regarding the application process related to the validation of STCs, please contact the following mailbox: stc [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu

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How can I know if an STC is still valid? How can I know if an STC has been revoked, suspended or surrendered?

EASA certificates are valid unless otherwise revoked, suspended or surrendered. In such cases, a related Certification Information will be published on the EASA website.

If you require confirmation regarding the validity of a particular STC, we kindly suggest that you contact the STC holder.

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I am an EU aircraft owner/operator and would like to apply for validation of an FAA STC installed on my aircraft?

EASA has put a new procedure in place to allow EASA member state aircraft owners/operators to apply for the validation of an FAA STC for a single aircraft serial number if certain conditions are met.

The scope of fiexed wing aircraft to which this process can be applied is limited to:

  • Small Aeroplanes ≤ 5 700 kg MTOW
  • Very Light Aeroplane
  • Light Sport Aeroplane
  • (Powered) Sailplanes

The applicant is required to submit an application form for EASA validation of FAA Supplemental Type Certificate classified as Basic and limited to one serial number(FO.CERT.00134) and to  declare that the below conditions are met:

  • FAA STC has been installed for a long time with no known continuing airworthiness issues;
  • FAA STC holder either not able or not willing to apply for EASA validation;
  • A checks against the latest EASA-FAA Technical Implementation Procedures (TIP) provisions confirmed that the FAA STC is classified as “Basic”;
  • Confirmation that the applicant has access to design data and instructions for operations and continued airworthiness;
  • Acknowledgement of the applicant’s obligations as Holder of the STC in accordance with Part 21, point 21.A.118A

Please note that High Performance Aircraft and any change impacting noise requirements are excluded from this process and is valid only for Fixed Wing aircraft STCs.

The subsequent validation will be limited to a single aircraft serial number to allow the aircraft to be imported and to be issued a Certificate of Airworthiness. This validation is not transferrable to or amendable with another serial number.

EASA will charge this activity in accordance with Commission Regulation (EU) No 319/2014 and the applicable fee is set at one working hour per application.

Download application form FO.CERT.00134 - Application for validation of FAA STC classified as Basic and limited to one s/n

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What is the procedure for validations of FAA STCs classified as basic?

A fast track procedure is in place for validations of FAA STCs classified as basic. According to the revision 5 of the Technical Implementation Procedure (TIP), basic STCs are accepted by EASA without further technical review. However, the issuance of the EASA STC can take place only after the FAA STC has been issued and the complete technical data package has been submitted to EASA including the FAA concurrence letter classified as basic.

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Permit to fly

I want to apply for approval of flight conditions - what do I need to do? I want to apply for Permit to Fly - what do I need to do?

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is responsible for the approval of flight conditions. Such an approval is the basis on which a Permit to Fly (PtF) can be issued by the Competent Authority of the State of Registry, or of the State prescribing the identification marks of an aircraft.

A PtF is generally issued when a certificate of airworthiness is temporarily invalid, or when a certificate of airworthiness cannot be granted, but the aircraft is nevertheless capable of performing a safe flight.

Please use EASA Form FO.CERT.00037 (with EASA Form 18B in the annex) to apply for approval of flight conditions at EASA. With the approved flight conditions (EASA Form 18B) you can apply for a Permit to Fly at the local national aviation authority the aircraft is registered.

More information can be found in the fact sheet on Permit to Fly which is published on the EASA website. Please click here.

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Application of Alternative Method of Compliance (AMOC) to Airworthiness Directive (AD)

When do I need to apply for an AMOC approval - and what do I need to do?

All applications for 'Request for acceptance of Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOC) with Airworthiness Directive (AD)' must be submitted to EASA using EASA Form FO.CAP.00042 duly completed and signed. It should also be noted that every AMOC application request should relate to one AD only. Below you will find the link to the application form as well as to additional information regarding AMOC.

For application forms, click here.
For general information for AD, click here.
For further FAQ on this topic, click here.

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Certification Support for Validation (CSV)

I would like to apply for Certification Support for Validation in Third Countries – what do I need to do?

You need to fill in the EASA form FO.CERT.00041 which can be found here.

There are two different scenarios:

Forwarding Letter only - without need for technical support (category 1): Your EASA approval and related documents will be only forwarded together with an EASA Forwarding Letter to the validating authority. There is no technical support foreseen. This EASA service is free of charge.

Full EASA Validation Support - with need for technical support (category 2): Your EASA approval will be forwarded to the responsible technical section. An EASA PCM will be allocated your task and will prepare the EASA Forwarding Letter. The Applicant Services Department will then submit the EASA Forwarding letter and its related documents to the validating authority. This EASA Service is charged on an hourly rate. Please consult the EASA fees and charges regulation Commission Regulation No 319/2014 for the applicable hourly rate. A financial estimate may be requested at submission of your application and prior commencement of work.

Please also refer to the FAQs on CSV on the EASA website

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How can I find out if I need to apply for “Forwarding Letter only - without need for technical support” or for “Full EASA Validation Support - with need for technical support”?

Please send an email to Validation [dot] Support [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu. We will investigate and confirm if you need to apply for Category 1 or Category 2:

“Forwarding Letter only”: For third countries that have neither a Bilateral Agreement nor a Working Arrangement with EASA in place.

“Full EASA Validation Support”: For third countries that have a Bilateral Agreement and/or Working Arrangement with EASA in place,  i.e. USA, Canada, Brazil, China, Japan, and Russia.

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What is a financial estimate?

The financial estimate is for information purposes only and is not mandatory for the applicant and aims at increasing the transparency on costs before the project starts.

It is a first estimation of working hours given by the technical section, before starting the technical investigation. The financial estimate is provided to the applicant upon request and only once the financial estimate is confirmed by the applicant an EASA Project will be created.

In case the foreseen working hours are not sufficient, the financial estimate may be revised and submitted to the applicant for acceptance. Please note that financial estimates are valid 3 months only.

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The validating authority is asking for a re-classification to Category 2. What do I need to do?

In case the technical investigation is more complex than foreseen in the beginning, the validating authority may ask for a re-classification from Category 1 to Category 2. In order to reflect this re-classification in our EASA system also for invoicing purposes, we would need your active involvement and kindly ask you to submit a revised EASA form FO.CSERV.00041 to Validation [dot] Support [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu. On the 3rd page, please delete box 5.2.2 and replace it by box 5.2.3.

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Which types of approvals can be validated in Third Countries?

The following approvals can be validated in Third Countries: Type Certificates (TC), Major Changes, STCs, AFMs and ETSOAs (European Technical Standard Order). Please send an application to Validation [dot] Support [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu.
ETSO-Applications please send to ETSOA [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu.

Approvals may be validated in third countries with which EASA has no Bilateral Agreement and/or Working Arrangement with EASA (category 1) or in third countries having a Bilateral Agreement and/or Working Arrangement with EASA (category 2)
Please also refer to the question on category 1 or 2.

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MTOW Rotorcraft

Why is my small rotorcraft charged as medium rotorcraft under F&C?

Commission Regulation (EU) No. 319/2014 establishes the EASA Fees and Charges and defines in Part V point (2) the following categories of Rotorcraft Products for this purpose (only):

- Large Rotorcraft refers to CS 29 and CS 27 cat A; 
- Small Rotorcraft refers to CS 27 with Maximum Take Off Weight (MTOW) below 3 175 Kg and limited to 4 seats, including pilot; 
- Medium Rotorcraft refers to other CS 27

According to EASA TCDS R.008, the AS350 rotorcraft is a CS27 rotorcraft with MTOW below 3 175kg and a seating capacity of 6, including the pilot. Hence it must be classified as Medium Rotorcraft as per the above definition.

According to EASA TCDS R.146, the AS355 rotorcraft is a CS27 rotorcraft with MTOW below 3 175kg and a seating capacity of 6 (or 7, if an optional two-place seat is installed), including the pilot. Hence it shall be classified as Medium Rotorcraft as per the above definition.

View the applicable Fees and Charges category for each product.

See in particular the EASA Product List – Rotorcraft.

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What does the Rotorcraft MTOW 50% rule mean?

For all post-TC design applications the applicable F&C category is based on the type level and corresponds to that category in which more or equal to 50% of the models are within a given type.

This change was introduced by the EASA F&C regulation (Commission Regulation (EU) 319/2014) as of April 2014 and changed the previously applicable rule that the highest weight category was applicable, even though it might have been only connected to one of the models.

In accordance with PART V/Explanatory Note (4) of EASA F&C regulation, the MTOW of the initial TC and subsequently of the majority of the related models covered by this Type Certificate (i.e. more than 50 %) determines the applicable MTOW category.

Should the number of models in both the higher and the lower MTOW categories being equal, the higher MTOW category applies. Once the MTOW category has been determined at the product type level, it is to be consequently applicable for all related applications, e.g. for minor changes, STCs, etc.

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Applications for organisations

Maintenance Organisations (MOA) / Maintenance Training Organisations (MTOA)

Where can I find the application forms for Maintenance Organisations (MOA)?

The application forms for Maintenance Organisation applications are available here.

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Can you give me the name of Part 145 (MOA) organisations in [EASA member state]?

According to the Part 145.1 EASA is the competent authority for organisations located outside the EU territories. Within the EU Member States each National Aviation Authority (NAA) is the competent authority.

In accordance with above specified regulatory paragraph, EASA publishes the list of valid and non-valid Foreign EASA Part-145 approvals located outside of the EU Member States which are issued by EASA.

Following the same reference each EU NAA is tasked to issue a similar list of approvals granted on its own territory. Unfortunately not all EU NAA do have such a list of national approvals or even a website.

For the moment we can provide you with the list of EASA member states on our website.

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We have a Part 145 approval from a national authorities that has no Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement with EASA. Now we are looking for an EASA 145 approval. What is to be done with regard to procedures, requirements and fee structure?

On our Foreign part-145 organisations page you will find useful information with regard to the requirements, the timeframe and the approval procedure.

Furthermore please consult also the User Guide for Applicants for Foreign Part-145 approvals and the application form EASA FORM 2.

Please note that the EASA Fees & Charges Regulation (Commission Regulation (EU) 319/2014) has entered into force on 01 April 2014.
For further information please consult the Fees & Charges FAQ.
Please review especially table 9 of the Fees & Charges Regulation (Commission Regulation (EU) 319/2014).
 

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Is it mandatory to hold a maintenance organization approval from a local NAA prior to applying EASA for an EASA Part-145 approval or is it possible to apply EASA directly without any approval from local CAA?

Please note that it is not mandatory to be an approved maintenance organisation from local CAA in country without bilateral agreement prior to applying for an EASA Part-145 approval for certain ratings and we confirm that it is possible to apply to EASA directly without any approval from local CAA.

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How much does my application/certificate cost for a Foreign EASA Part-145 approval?

For costs related to your approval, please refer to the tables sorted by application type that are provided in the Annex of the EASA fees and charges regulation Commission Regulation (EU) No 319/2014. Please review especially table 9 of the Fees & Charges Regulation (Commission Regulation (EU) 319/2014).

For further information please consult the Fees & Charges FAQ's

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We are an FAA Repair station and would like to apply for an initial application to EASA Part-145?

We kindly ask you to consult our EASA Part-145 organisations located in the USA
There you will find useful information with regard to the requirements, approval procedure and the fees & charges.

Please review EASA-FAA (MAG) for US approved organisations subject to Agreement between the United States of America and the European Community on cooperation in the regulation of civil aviation safety (as of 01 June 2016 currently at change 6)
It is required to complete EASA FORM 16 which should be submitted to your Principal Maintenance Inspector (PMI) at FAA. Please contact your PMI at FAA.

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We are an FAA Repair station and would like to apply for renewal of our EASA Part-145 approval?

According to the MAG CHANGE 6 “it is the applicants responsibility to prepare the renewal package in time to receive the new certificate. Typically, this should occur 90 days prior to the expiration.”
With regard to timing, these actions for renewal are completely disconnected from the applicant’s obligation to comply with EASAs Fees and Charges Regulation. Therefore please do not wait for the EASA invoice and proceed with the renewal process within the timeframe specified in the MAG.
Please submit the completed EASA FORM 16 to your PMI at FAA.
As soon as we will receive the complete continuation package from the FAA including EASA FORM 16, EASA FORM 9, Air Agency Certificate, operation specifications and repair station profile we will confirm receipt to the FAA and to your organisation.
Currently EASA sends out the invoices 60 days after the renewal of the approval. Payment shall be made only after the receipt of the invoice.

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We are an Approved Maintenance Organisation (AMO) in Canada and would like to apply for an initial application to EASA Part-145?

For more information you can visit our EASA Part-145 organisations located in Canada page and please review especially Maintenance Annex Guidance (MAG Rev.1)
There you will find useful information with regard to the requirements, approval procedure and the fees & charges.
It is required to complete EASA FORM 17 which should be submitted to your TCCA Regional Office. Please contact your TCCA Regional Office.

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We are an ANAC RBAC 145 Maintenance Organizations located in Brazil and would like to apply for an initial application to EASA Part-145

For more information you can visit our page EASA Part-145 Organisations located in Brazil and please review especially Maintenance Annex Guidance (MAG) EASA-ANAC.

It is required to complete EASA FORM 18 which should be submitted to your supervising ANAC Airworthiness Regional Office. Please contact your supervising ANAC Airworthiness Regional Office for any further questions.

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How much does my application/certificate cost for a Foreign EASA Part-145 approval with applicable bilateral agreement (USA, CANADA and BRAZIL)?

For costs related to your approval, please refer to the tables sorted by application type that are provided in the Annex of the EASA fees and charges regulation Commission Regulation (EU) No 319/2014. Please review especially table 12 of the Fees & Charges Regulation (Commission Regulation (EU) 319/2014).

For further information please visit the Fees & Charges FAQ's.

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Can you give me the name of Part 147 (MTOA) organisations in [EASA member state]?

Further to your request, please be informed that the Agency is only responsible for those training organisations located outside of the EASA Member States. For those located within the EASA member states, the National Aviation Authorities are responsible for the approval and the publication of the "national lists". Therefore you need to contact local National Aviation Authority directly to find the information you are looking for.

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How can I apply for an EASA Part-147 approval?

In order to apply for an EASA Part 147 Approval, it is required to send an application EASA form 12 together with a copy of the Certificate of Incorporation of the organisation (translated in English where necessary).

The scope of approval applied for should be detailed as much as possible, and the number of staff to be declared in the application form should be limited to the staffs –included contractors- that will be actively involved into the Part 147 operations. The type and number of courses and the number of facilities should be mentioned on the application form.

Following the reception of the application form 12, an eligibility check will be carried out; the purpose of the eligibility check is to ensure that the scope of the application is relevant, but also that the certification process can be carried out in a reasonably timely manner, taking into account -in particular- the availability of EASA surveyors. Please also note that travelling arrangements are subject to a risk assessment and surveyors may not be allowed to travel to certain regions/ countries.

Once an application has been accepted, an estimate of the fees shall be provided to the applicant and upon acceptance the invoice related to the initial certification task shall be submitted. The contact details of the surveyor will be provided to the applicant and he is requested to contact the surveyor in order to organise the review of documents (MTOE, courses, exam questions…) as well as the schedule for the initial certification audit.

Download the User Guide regarding the certification process

For further questions regarding our fees and charges please consult the Fees & Charges Regulation (Commission Regulation (EC) 319/2014) which has entered into force on 01 April 2014 Commission Regulation (EU) No 319/2014. Please review especially table 10 of the Fees & Charges Regulation (Commission Regulation (EU) 319/2014). For further information visit our Fees & Charges FAQ's

This regulation is used to determine the applicable initial fees, and then the annual oversight fees. Please note that the fees are subject to an annual inflation rate and do not include the travel costs associated to on-site audits (flight & train tickets, accommodation and travel hours -which are charged on an hourly rate basis- etc...). These will be charged separately.

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How much does my application/certificate cost for a Foreign EASA Part-147 approval?

For costs related to your approval, please refer to the tables sorted by application type that are provided in the Annex of the EASA fees and charges regulation Commission Regulation (EU) No 319/2014. Please review especially table 10 of the Fees & Charges Regulation (Commission Regulation (EU) 319/2014). The table  explaining how we practically determine chargeable courses and sites is also available in the FAQ section C.4.5 of the Fees and Charges regulation

Please note that the fees are subject to an annual inflation rate and do not include the travel costs associated to on-site audits (flight & train tickets, accommodation and travel hours -which are charged on an hourly rate basis- etc...). These will be charged separately.

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How can I apply for a Part-66 licence?

If you want to get a Part 66 licence, you have to comply with the Part-66 requirements (in particular, 66.A.10 Applications and for experience: 66.A.25 “Basic knowledge requirements”, item (a), and 66.A.30 “Experience Requirements”).

You can find this information in the EASA Web Page at the following link:

The basic knowledge requirements must be demonstrated by examination. These examinations can be performed either in a Part-147 training organisation approved by a EU Member State or as delivered by the competent authorities of the EU Member State where you may intend to apply for a licence. View the list of the foreign EASA approved Part-147 organisations

Further information via our Regulations FAQ's

In case of questions please use our contact form

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How much does my application/certificate cost for a Part-M subpart G Foreign CAMO Organisation?

For costs related to your approval, please refer to the tables sorted by application type that are provided in the Annex of the EASA fees and charges regulation Commission Regulation (EU) No 319/2014. Please review especially table 11 of the Fees & Charges Regulation (Commission Regulation (EU) 319/2014).

Further information via our Fees & Charges FAQ's.

Associated audit travel costs (flight, hotel, daily allowance) are also charged to the organisation (you can consider an average of 2/3 audits per year with one/two auditors, based on the scope of work of the organisation).

Related Frequently Asked Questions:

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