Cabin Crew

Use of Child Seats on Board

Can I use a child seat on board for my baby/child? What about a rear-facing child seat?

EASA cares for the safe transport of babies and children by air and encourages the use of child seats on board an aircraft. EASA is actively working with the European Member States and with the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) Cabin Safety Group (ICSG) on finding a solution that would facilitate a global mutual recognition of child restraint devices for infants and children amongst States and airlines. 

Having a child seat on board an aircraft requires an assessment of several aspects, such as the aircraft seat itself, if the aircraft seat is forward-facing or rear-facing, how the child seat can be safely secured on the aircraft seat, the distance between seat rows where the child seat is intended to be placed, etc. Practically all child seats allowed on board are those that have been tested and certified for the use in cars. There may be limitations for their use in cars and there are also limitations for their use in an aircraft cabin. Depending on the specifics of the child seat, but also on the specifics of the aircraft seats and of the aircraft cabin arrangement, the operator decides which child seats are accepted on board its aircraft and which ones cannot be accepted due to safety reasons.

Rear-facing child seats are recommended for the use in cars for babies and children up until the age of 4. The use of a rear-facing (also referred to as ‘aft-facing’) child seat on board an aircraft may however be limited due to the distance between passenger seat rows (so-called ‘seat pitch’). Airlines are free to order from an aircraft manufacturer an aircraft with a cabin arrangement of their choice (including the distance between seat rows) provided it is compliant with the existing aircraft certification rules. Each cabin arrangement must be approved by EASA and must comply with the applicable safety standards including emergency evacuation. EU legislation however does not specify a prescriptive figure related to the minimum distance between seats (i.e. seat rows), aircraft designers comply with the standards using a range of biometrics.

It is the operator’s responsibility to establish procedures for its operation which are subject to the approval or acceptance by the National Aviation Authority of that EU Member State. Please, contact your airline for information on the use and types of child seats on board.

Extract from the EU rules on air operations related to the acceptance of child seats on board:

Commission Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 on air operations, Annex IV – Part-CAT:

CAT.IDE.A.205 Seats, seat safety belts, restraint systems and child restraint devices

(a) Aeroplanes shall be equipped with:

(1) a seat or berth for each person on board who is aged 24 months or more;

(2) a seat belt on each passenger seat and restraining belts for each berth except as specified in (3);

(3) a seat belt with upper torso restraint system on each passenger seat and restraining belts on each berth in the case of aeroplanes with an MCTOM of less than 5700 kg and with an MOPSC of less than nine, having an individual CofA first issued on or after 8 April 2015;

(4) a child restraint device (CRD) for each person on board younger than 24 months;

 …….

AMC1 CAT.IDE.A.205 Seats, seat safety belts, restraint systems and child restraint devices

CHILD RESTRAINT DEVICES (CRDS)

(a) A CRD is considered to be acceptable if:

(1) it is a ‘supplementary loop belt’ manufactured with the same techniques and the same materials as the approved safety belts; or

(2) it complies with (b).

(b) Provided the CRD can be installed properly on the respective aircraft seat, the following CRDs are considered acceptable:

(1) CRDs approved for use in aircraft by the competent authority on the basis of a technical standard and marked accordingly;

(2) CRDs approved for use in motor vehicles according to the UN standard ECE R 44, -03 or later series of amendments;

(3) CRDs approved for use in motor vehicles and aircraft according to Canadian CMVSS 213/213.1;

(4) CRDs approved for use in motor vehicles and aircraft according to US FMVSS No 213 and manufactured to these standards on or after 26 February 1985. US approved CRDs manufactured after this date must bear the following labels in red letters:

(i) ‘THIS CHILD RESTRAINT SYSTEM CONFORMS TO ALL APPLICABLE FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS’; and

(ii) ‘THIS RESTRAINT IS CERTIFIED FOR USE IN MOTOR VEHICLES AND AIRCRAFT’;

(5) CRDs qualified for use in aircraft according to the German ‘Qualification Procedure for Child Restraint Systems for Use in Aircraft’ (TÜV Doc.: TÜV/958-01/2001); and

(6) devices approved for use in cars, manufactured and tested to standards equivalent to those listed above. The device should be marked with an associated qualification sign, which shows the name of the qualification organisation and a specific identification number, related to the associated qualification project. The qualifying organisation should be a competent and independent organisation that is acceptable to the competent authority.

(c) Location

(1) Forward-facing CRDs may be installed on both forward-and rearward-facing passenger seats, but only when fitted in the same direction as the passenger seat on which they are positioned. Rearward-facing CRDs should only be installed on forward-facing passenger seats. A CRD should not be installed within the radius of action of an airbag unless it is obvious that the airbag is de-activated or it can be demonstrated that there is no negative impact from the airbag.

(2) An infant in a CRD should be located as near to a floor level exit as feasible.

(3) An infant in a CRD should not hinder evacuation for any passenger.

(4) An infant in a CRD should neither be located in the row (where rows are existing) leading to an emergency exit nor located in a row immediately forward or aft of an emergency exit. A window passenger seat is the preferred location. An aisle passenger seat or a cross aisle passenger seat that forms part of the evacuation route to exits is not recommended. Other locations may be acceptable provided the access of neighbour passengers to the nearest aisle is not obstructed by the CRD.

(5) In general, only one CRD per row segment is recommended. More than one CRD per row segment is allowed if the infants are from the same family or travelling group provided the infants are accompanied by a responsible adult sitting next to them.

(6) A row segment is the fraction of a row separated by two aisles or by one aisle and the aeroplane fuselage.

(d) Installation

(1) CRDs should only be installed on a suitable aeroplane seat with the type of connecting device they are approved or qualified for. For instance, CRDs to be connected by a three point harness only (most rearward-facing baby CRDs currently available) should not be attached to an aeroplane seat with a lap belt only; a CRD designed to be attached to a vehicle seat only by means of rigid bar lower anchorages (ISO-FIX or US equivalent), should only be used on aeroplane seats that are equipped with such connecting devices and should not be attached by the aeroplane seat lap belt. The method of connecting should be the one shown in the manufacturer’s instructions provided with each CRD.

(2) All safety and installation instructions should be followed carefully by the responsible adult accompanying the infant. Cabin crew should prohibit the use of any inadequately installed CRD or not qualified seat

(3)  If a forward-facing CRD with a rigid backrest is to be fastened by a lap belt, the restraint device should be fastened when the backrest of the passenger seat on which it rests is in a reclined position. Thereafter, the backrest is to be positioned upright. This procedure ensures better tightening of the CRD on the aircraft seat if the aircraft seat is reclinable.

(4) The buckle of the adult safety belt must be easily accessible for both opening and closing, and must be in line with the seat belt halves (not canted) after tightening.

(5) Forward-facing restraint devices with an integral harness must not be installed such that the adult safety belt is secured over the infant.

(e) Operation

(1) Each CRD should remain secured to a passenger seat during all phases of flight unless it is properly stowed when not in use.

(2) Where a CRD is adjustable in recline, it must be in an upright position for all occasions when passenger restraint devices are required.

Extract from the ICAO guidance on the approval and use of child restraint systems (ICAO Document 10049):

2.4.3 The seat pitch or the available space between two rows of seats may also be an issue and particularly significant for aft-facing CRS as they are further reclined and take up more horizontal space. The inability to be effectively installed using existing aircraft seat belts may also render motor vehicle CRS ineffective on board. The location of anchor points can also be problematic. This includes the location of the aircraft seat belt attachment to the aircraft seat, as a CRS must translate forward until the belt path angle allows for belt tension forces to restrain the device.

Note: CRS means ‘child restraint system’.

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Medical fitness

Is Cabin Crew Member required to carry his/her medical certificate when on duty?

Reference: Regulation (EU) No 1178/2011 Aircrew, Annex IV Part-MED and ED Decision 2011/015/R are available on EASA website. 

EU legislation does not contain any provisions on the carriage of a medical report when on duty. MED.C.030(a)(2) requires cabin crew members to provide the related information of their medical report or the copy of their medical report to the operator(s) employing their services. MED.C.030(b) requires the cabin crew medical report to indicate the date of the aero-medical assessment, whether the cabin crew member has been assessed fit or unfit, the date of the next aero-medical assessment and, if applicable, any limitation(s). Any other elements shall be subject to medical confidentiality in accordance with MED.A.015.

Cabin crew members are encouraged to carry their medical report or a copy while on duty to attest their medical fitness and limitation(s). The operator may also have procedures in place through which a cabin crew member’s medical report can be readily available upon request by a competent authority.

 

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Decrease of medical fitness and an ‘unfit’ medical report.

Reference: Regulation (EU) No 1178/2011 Aircrew, Annex IV Part-MED and ED Decision 2011/015/R are available on EASA website.

In case of a decrease in cabin crew member’s medical fitness, the cabin crew member shall, without undue delay, seek the advice of an aero-medical examiner or aero-medical centre or, where allowed by the Member State, an occupational health medical practitioner who will assess the medical fitness of the individual and decide if the cabin crew member is fit to resume his/her duties.

In case a cabin crew member has been assessed as ‘unfit’, the cabin crew member has the right of a secondary review. The cabin crew member shall not perform duties on an aircraft and shall not exercise the privileges of their cabin crew attestation until assessed as ‘fit’ again.

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Where can I find the EU medical requirements for Cabin Crew?

References:  (are available on EASA website)
Regulation (EU) No 1178/2011 Aircrew, Annex IV Part-MED.
ED Decision 2011/015/R.

NOTE: This FAQ only provides an overview of the areas covered by the individual subparts A, C and D of the regulation. The medical requirements for cabin crew are extensive in text, therefore to find the exact aspect you are looking for, we recommend that you directly refer to the respective subpart of the regulation.

Regulation (EU) No 1178/2011 Annex IV: Part-MED:

  • Subpart A, Section 1: general requirements, such as competent authority, scope, definitions, medical confidentiality, decrease in medical fitness and obligations of medical doctors conducting the aero-medical assessment of cabin crew;
  • Subpart C, all three Sections: requirements  for medical fitness of cabin crew;
  • Subpart D,
    • Section 1: Aero-medical examiners (AEM);
    • Section 3: Occupational Health Medical Practitioners (OHMP), the requirements for the medical doctors who conduct aero-medical assessment of cabin crew. Please note that general medical practitioners (GMP) (Section 2) may not conduct aero-medical assessment of cabin crew.

ED Decision 2011/015/R contains acceptable means of compliance (AMC) and guidance material (GM) which complement the rules. The AMC and GM specify the detailed medical conditions and the related medical examinations or investigations.

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Language proficiency

Is there any requirement on cabin crew member(s) communication with passengers in a certain language?

Reference: Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 Air Operations, Annex III (Part-ORO) and Annex IV (Part-CAT) is available on EASA website.

There is no EU (or ICAO requirement) that cabin crew members must speak English. It is a general practice that cabin crew members do speak English to facilitate the communication in the aviation industry. The operator defines what languages its cabin crew members must be able to speak and at what level. 

Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 specifies the following two requirements:

 

  • The operator shall ensure that all personnel are able to understand the language in which those parts of the Operations Manual, which pertain to their duties and responsibilities, are written (ORO.MLR.100(k)), and
  • The operator shall ensure that all crew members can communicate with each other in a common language (CAT.GEN.MPA.120).

    There is no EU (or ICAO) requirement for a specific language regarding cabin crew communication with passengers. It must be noted that it is difficult, if not impossible, to mandate the ‘required’ languages to be used on board with regard to communication with passengers, as this differs on daily basis from a flight to flight. For example, a German airline has a flight departing from Frankfurt to Madrid and it is assumed that the cabin crew members speak German since they work for a German operator. In addition, they may speak English if the operator selected this language as a criterion. The passenger profile may, however, be such that these languages are not ‘desired’ on this flight as passengers do not necessarily speak or understand any of the two languages (passengers may be e.g. Russian, Chinese, Iranian, Indian, Pakistani, Polish, Finnish, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak, etc., or there is a large group of e.g. Japanese tourists).

    Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 mandates the operator to ensure that briefings and demonstrations related to safety are provided to passengers in a form that facilitates the application of the procedures applicable in case of an emergency and that passengers are provided with a safety briefing card on which picture type-instructions indicate the operation of emergency equipment and exits likely to be used by passengers. It is therefore the operator’s responsibility to choose the languages to be used on its flights, which may vary depending on the destination or a known passenger profile. It is also a practice of some operators to employ ‘language speakers’, i.e. cabin crew members speaking certain languages, who mainly operate their language-desired route(s).   

 

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Do cabin crew members have to be able to speak English to obtain their Cabin Crew Attestation?

Reference: Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 Air Operations, Annex III (Part-ORO) and Annex IV (Part-CAT) is available on EASA website.

There is no EU (or ICAO requirement) that cabin crew members must speak English. It is a general practice that cabin crew members do speak English to facilitate the communication in the aviation industry. The operator defines what languages its cabin crew members must be able to speak and at what level. 

Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 specifies the following two requirements:

 

  • The operator shall ensure that all personnel are able to understand the language in which those parts of the Operations Manual, which pertain to their duties and responsibilities, are written (ORO.MLR.100(k)), and
  • The operator shall ensure that all crew members can communicate with each other in a common language (CAT.GEN.MPA.120).

    There is no EU (or ICAO) requirement for a specific language regarding cabin crew communication with passengers. It must be noted that it is difficult, if not impossible, to mandate the ‘required’ languages to be used on board with regard to communication with passengers, as this differs on daily basis from a flight to flight. For example, a German airline has a flight departing from Frankfurt to Madrid and it is assumed that the cabin crew members speak German since they work for a German operator. In addition, they may speak English if the operator selected this language as a criterion. The passenger profile may, however, be such that these languages are not ‘desired’ on this flight as passengers do not necessarily speak or understand any of the two languages (passengers may be e.g. Russian, Chinese, Iranian, Indian, Pakistani, Polish, Finnish, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak, etc., or there is a large group of e.g. Japanese tourists).

    Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 mandates the operator to ensure that briefings and demonstrations related to safety are provided to passengers in a form that facilitates the application of the procedures applicable in case of an emergency and that passengers are provided with a safety briefing card on which picture type-instructions indicate the operation of emergency equipment and exits likely to be used by passengers. It is therefore the operator’s responsibility to choose the languages to be used on its flights, which may vary depending on the destination or a known passenger profile. It is also a practice of some operators to employ ‘language speakers’, i.e. cabin crew members speaking certain languages, who mainly operate their language-desired route(s).   

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Practical ‘raft’ training

Why does Initial training under Part-CC require practical ‘raft’ training even if the operator’s aircraft is not equipped with slide rafts or life rafts?

Reference: Regulation (EU) No 1178/2011 Aircrew as amended by Regulation (EU) No 290/2012 Part-CC available on EASA website.

Under EU-OPS, practical training on the use of rafts was required during Initial training. EU-OPS was a regulation directed, and applicable, to operators, therefore, an operator could provide raft training only when cabin crew member was to actually  operate on the operator’s aeroplane fitted with rafts or similar equipment. The training was conducted with that operator’s specific equipment/rafts.

The Initial training under Regulation (EU) No 1178/2011, Part CC is no longer ‘operator-related’, it is generic, therefore, the practical training on rafts or similar equipment and an actual practice in water are not specific to an operator’s equipment. 

CCA holders, when recruited by an operator, are expected to have the ability to perform all types of cabin crew duties, including ditching related duties in water. Part-CC Cabin Crew Attestation (CCA) is issued for a life time and is recognised across all EU. Unlike the EU OPS Attestation, the CCA is subject to validity to attest the competence of the individual cabin crew member. This is foreseen in the Basic Regulation (Regulation (EC) No 216/2008) taking into account the increasing mobility of personnel in the aviation industry and the need to further harmonise cabin crew qualifications.

An operator may be granted an approval to provide Part-CC Initial training and to issue the CCA (entitled to a mutual recognition across the EU). That operator no longer acts as an operator training only its own cabin crew for its specific operations. That operator acts as a training organisation training future cabin crew who, in their life time, may also operate with other operators and in other Member States. 

 

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Fire and smoke training

What are the requirements for cabin crew fire/smoke training?

References:  (all are available on EASA website)
Regulation (EU) No 1178/2011 Aircrew as amended by Regulation (EU) No 290/2012.
Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 Air Operations.
ED Decision 2014/017/R containing AMC and GM to the rules.

NOTE: The requirements on fire and smoke training are extensive in text, therefore to have a better view and understanding, this FAQ should be read together with the rule text. The relevant rule reference is included in each line (type of training) below. 

1. Initial training:

  • CC.TRA.220 Initial training course and examination
  • Appendix 1 to Part-CC Initial training course and examination / Training programme;
    Point 8 on Fire and Smoke training
    Regulation (EU) No 290/2012, Annex V Part-CC.

2. Aircraft type training:

  • ORO.CC.125 Aircraft type specific and operator conversion training
    Reference: Regulation (EU) No 965/2012
  • AMC1 ORO.CC.125(c) and AMC1 ORO.CC.125(d) containing a training programme for aircraft type specific training and operator conversion training respectivel
    Reference: ED Decision 2014/017/R

3. Recurrent training:

  • ORO.CC.140 Recurrent training
    Reference: Regulation (EU) No 965/2012
  • AMC1 ORO.CC.140 Recurrent training
    Reference: ED Decision 2014/017/R

4. Refresher training’:

  • ORO.CC.145 Refresher training
    Reference: Regulation (EU) No 965/2012
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Aircraft type training

Do I have to undergo Aircraft type specific training and operator conversion training with every new operator I join if I am already qualified on that aircraft type?

Reference: Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 Air Operations, Annex III (Part ORO) is available on EASA website.

Aircraft type specific training and operator conversion training is not transferable from one operator to another as each operator may have its own customised aircraft cabin configurations incl. differences in safety and emergency equipment and standard operating and emergency procedures. Therefore, as required by ORO.CC.125, cabin crew members must complete Aircraft type specific training and operator conversion training before being assigned to operate on the operator’s aircraft.

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Can a cabin crew training organisation (CCTO) provide Aircraft type specific training and operator conversion training?

Reference: Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 Air Operations, Annex III (Part ORO) is available on EASA website.

Aircraft type specific training and operator conversion training is a requirement directed to operators as specified in ORO.GEN.005, therefore the operator is responsible for this training. However, an operator may contract out some activities (e.g. training) as specified in ORO.GEN.205 complemented by AMC1 ORO.GEN.205 and GM1 ORO.GEN.205 and GM2 ORO.GEN.205. Therefore, CCTO can only provide Aircraft type specific training and operator conversion training if contracted by an operator to do so. The operator remains responsible for this training and for the competence of its cabin crew.

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Reduction of cabin crew during ground operations

Do the evacuation procedures with a reduced number of required cabin crew during ground operations or in unforeseen circumstances require prior endorsement?

Reference: Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 Air Operations and the associated ED Decisions are available on EASA website.

The minimum number of cabin crew for an aircraft type, as determined by certification and approved by EASA, is stated on the Type Certification Data Sheet. The minimum number of cabin crew and the evacuation procedures form part of the Operations Manual. Reducing the minimum cabin crew is a deviation from the required minimum number and requires close monitoring. Changes to evacuation procedures with a reduced number of cabin crew are required to be acceptable to the Competent Authority.
The minimum number of cabin crew required in the passenger compartment may be reduced under conditions stated in ORO.CC.205 incl. AMC1 ORO.CC.205 (c)(1). Procedures must be established in the operations manual; it has to be ensured that an equivalent level of safety is achieved with the reduced number of cabin crew, in particular for evacuation of passengers.

 

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Instructor and Examiner being the same person – conflict of interest

Instructor who provided any topic of the Initial training should not act as Examiner to avoid conflict of interest. What about small operators / cabin crew training organisations employing only one ground Instructor, for example to cover dangerous goods or aero-medical aspects and first aid?

Reference: Regulation (EU) No 1178/2011 Aircrew and ED Decision 2012/006/R are available on EASA website.

ED Decision 2012/006/R, AMC1 ARA.CC.200(b)(2) clarifies that in such cases, the operator/training organisation establishes procedures to avoid situations that could lead to a conflict of interest, e.g. where an Instructor has to check/evaluate the proficiency of the trainee he/she has trained.
The qualifications of Instructors/Trainers, as well as of Examiners, are not defined at EU level, and remain to be defined by each Member State. Therefore, only the Competent Authorities may assess, when approving the training and checking programmes of the operator/training organisation, if the procedures can ensure that the objective of the rule is met. 
 
AMC1 ARA.CC.200(b)(2) Approval of organisations to provide cabin crew training or to issue cabin crew attestations 
PERSONNEL CONDUCTING EXAMINATIONS
For any element being examined for the issue of a cabin crew attestation as required in Part CC, the person who delivered the associated training or instruction should not also conduct the examination. However, if the organisation has appropriate procedures in place to avoid conflict of interest regarding the conduct of the examination and/or the results, this restriction need not apply.
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Minimum required cabin crew

Determination of the minimum required number of cabin crew on an aircraft

Reference: Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 Air Operations and the associated ED Decisions are available on EASA website.

NOTE: The purpose of this FAQ is to explain how the operator and the Competent Authority (National Aviation Authority) conclude the minimum number of cabin crew required on the operator’s aircraft. This FAQ does not provide specific numbers for aircraft types or individual aircraft. The minimum number of cabin crew may vary on each aircraft, depending on the certification history of that aircraft. To learn the minimum number of cabin crew on (your) specific aircraft, please, consult your Competent Authority. To have a better view and understanding of the explanation below, this FAQ should be read together with the rule ORO.CC.100 (Regulation (EU) No 965/2012, Annex III (Part-ORO), Subpart-CC, paragraph ORO.CC.100).                                                                                                                                                                                                            
For each aircraft cabin configuration used by the operator, the rule for air operations relies on the airworthiness certification process (initial type certification or major modification or supplemental type certificate) to establish the minimum number of cabin crew required for a safe evacuation. If this number has been established during the certification process, it represents the number required by ORO.CC.100(b)(1). If this number does not exist (historically, not all aircraft (currently still in operation) had the minimum number of cabin crew clearly defined in their certification documentation), the minimum number of cabin crew on the particular aircraft will be established by a simple calculation in accordance with ORO.CC.100(b)(2). 

Therefore, to determine the minimum required number of cabin crew on the operator’s aircraft, the operator and the Authority must refer to the operator’s certification documentation issued for the aircraft in question to see if the number of cabin crew has been established, i.e. if it is written in the certification documentation.

In summary:
When the airworthiness certification documentation of the aircraft in question was issued:

1. Before 3rd July 2017, the operator may apply the calculation ‘1 per 50’, i.e. one cabin crew  member for fifty installed passengers seats of that aircraft cabin configuration (rule reference: ORO.CC.100(b)(2)). This calculation is only possible in cases where the certification documentation of the aircraft does not include the minimum number of cabin crew. 

2. After 3rd July 2017, the operator must apply the number of cabin crew specified in that aircraft’s certification documentation (rule reference: ORO.CC.100(b)(1)). EASA Certification Memo CM-CS-008 Issue 01 states that the minimum number of cabin crew will be clearly specified. 

Background: In accordance with Regulation (EU) No 965/2012, paragraph ORO.CC.100, when establishing the number of cabin crew needed for each aircraft and flight, the operator has to consider all operational aspects as required by ORO.CC.100(a) and the associated AMC1 ORO.CC.100. Paragraph ORO.CC.100(b) then provides the methods for determining the minimum number of cabin crew, i.e. by either applying the number established during the certification process or by a calculation of 1 cabin crew member per 50 installed passenger seats.  

The development stage of Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 (AIR OPS) initially did not include the paragraph (b)(2), i.e. the ‘1 per 50’ calculation, in ORO.CC.100. This inclusion was done last minute in a way that resulted in the overall lack of clarity of ORO.CC.100(b), i.e. how to establish the minimum required number of cabin crew. This led to some implementation difficulties for operators when the new operational rules (AIR OPS) were introduced. To help with the implementation, EASA published SIB 2014-29, which provided detailed information on how to comply with ORO.CC.100. The SIB was supported by the EU Members States, however resulted in a strong opposition by EU operators. As a result, discussions were held in 2015 between EASA and IATA/IACA on the application of ORO.CC.100(b), i.e. how to establish the minimum required number of cabin crew. EASA acknowledged that the interpretation of ORO.CC.100(b) was unclear. As an outcome of these discussions, on 7th December 2015 EASA communicated to the stakeholders the ‘EASA conclusions following the consultation on the proposed Certification Memo and Safety Information Bulletin on minimum cabin crew for twin‐aisle aeroplanes’.    

On 3rd July 2017, EASA published the Certification Memo EASA-CM-CS-008 Issue 01. This document clarifies to aircraft manufacturers and design organisations that the number of cabin crew assumed in their evacuation certification activity must be clearly stated in their documentation. Following the publication of the EASA Certification Memo, the relevant Type Certification Data Sheets (TCDSs) have been amended and now include the minimum number of cabin crew already established by the aircraft manufacturers. In some cases the applicable minimum number of cabin crew for a particular aircraft may be different to that shown in the TCDS, for instance in case of specific cabin layouts if a lower number of cabin crew was approved by EASA.

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Working for multiple operators

I work for Operator A and have short/long-term contract(s) with Operator B. What training do I require when I return back to Operator A after the completion of my short/long-term contract with Operator B?

Ref.: Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 Air Operations, Annex III (Part-ORO) is available on EASA website.

When joining Operator B, the cabin crew member undergoes the Aircraft type specific and operator conversion training & Familiarisation.

When returning to Operator A (after completing the short/long-term contract with Operator B) the options are:

  • No training is required, provided the cabin crew member’s recency is within the validity of the Recurrent training and the cabin crew member has operated on Operator A aircraft type during the last 6 months. 
  • Recurrent training if the validity is about to expire.
  • Refresher training, provided the cabin crew member has not operated on Operator A aircraft type for more than 6 months.
  • Refresher training, if Operator A considers this training to be necessary due to complex equipment or procedures for the cabin crew member who has been absent from flying duties for less than 6 months.
  • Aircraft type specific and operator conversion training & Familiarisation if the validity of the Recurrent training has expired.
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Passenger safety briefing

Is there any requirement on what language(s) should be used for information provided to passengers via safety briefings and announcements?

Reference: Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 Air Operations, Annex III: Part-ORO is available on EASA website. ICAO Doc 10086 Manual on information and instructions for passenger safety is available on ICAO website.

Regulation (EU) No 965/2012 mandates the operator to ensure that briefings and demonstrations related to safety are provided to passengers in a form that facilitates the application of the procedures applicable in case of an emergency and that passengers are provided with a safety briefing card on which picture type-instructions indicate the operation of emergency equipment and exits likely to be used by passengers. It is therefore the operator’s responsibility to choose the languages to be used on its flights, which may vary depending on the destination or a known passenger profile. It is indeed difficult, if not impossible, to accommodate every ‘required’ language on board as this differs on daily basis from a flight to flight. For example, a German airline has a flight departing from Frankfurt to Rome and it is assumed that the most required languages on this flight will be German and Italian. The passenger profile may, however, be such that these languages are not ‘desired’ on this flight as passengers do not necessarily speak or understand any of the two languages (passengers may be e.g. Irish, Canadian, Russian, Chinese, Iranian, Egyptian, Pakistani, Latvian, Finnish, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak, etc., or there is a large group of e.g. Japanese tourists). It is therefore a practice of some operators to employ ‘language speakers’, i.e. cabin crew members speaking certain languages, who mainly operate their language-desired route(s). The aircraft may also have an option of a multi-language pre-recorded set of public announcements, the operator may choose this feature when modifying the cabin systems on its aircraft configuration. 

ICAO Doc 10086 recommends that information provided to passengers via safety briefings, announcements and safety demonstrations should be transmitted in the language of the operator and in English to promote appropriate communication with passengers. Further, that in order to cover the largest percentage of passengers on board on international flights, the operator should consider the use of English and the use of the official language of the State of departure and destination. In addition, the operator should consider the language(s) of the passengers on board and assign language-qualified cabin crew members or interpreters on board the aircraft, on specific routes. The operator should verify that emergency exit-row occupants comprehend the language spoken by the crew.

 

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