Application process

How do I apply for a certificate/approval?

APPLICANT PORTAL

If you are an applicant from one of the EASA member states, the US and Canada, online submission of your application via the Applicant Portal is now the preferred method for receiving your application. The Applicant Portal offers numerous benefits: 

- Simplifies applying for certification tasks - saving time and effort
- Enables viewing and monitoring the status of applications 
- Allows applicants to manage their own contact details and user credentials
- Reduces administrative transactions 
- Improves data quality due to integration with a centralised list for aeronautical products

The following applications are covered by the Applicant Portal:

  • Major Change
  • Major Repair
  • Derivative
  • Minor Change (including Minor Change to STC)
  • Minor Repair
  • Supplemental Type Certificate – Initial
  • Supplemental Type Certificate – Major Change
  • ETSOA – Initial
  • ETSOA – Minor Change

Further applications will be introduced to the Applicant Portal in the future.

If you wish to register to use the EASA Applicant Portal please send an email to Applicant [dot] Portal [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
Please inform us if you wish to receive further information or a demonstration of the portal.

In case of questions and technical issues, please contact: Applicant [dot] Portal [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu.

The use of the Applicant Portal has been introduced to other non-EASA Member State applicants. Please contact applicant [dot] portal [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu for further information.

Note: The use of the Applicant Portal for applications concerning Major Change/Repair, Derivate, Minor Change/Repair, STC and ETSO will soon become mandatory

View list of EASA Member States

Application forms
For applications that are not yet covered by the Applicant Portal and for applicants who are not yet registered with the Applicant Portal, please download from the EASA website the application form you need. Depending on your application, please send it to the email address indicated on the last page of the application form:

TC [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
MajorChange-MajorRepair [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
MinorChange-MinorRepair [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
STC [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
etsoa [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
AFMchange [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
CertificateTransfer [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
Validation [dot] Support [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu
flightconditions [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu

 

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I would like to revise my application submitted through the Applicant Portal. What do I have to do?

Currently, the feature for editing or revising an already submitted application in the Applicant Portal is still being developed. In the meantime, if you wish to make any amendments, please contact EASA by sending an email to new [dot] applications [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu quoting the EASA request or project number. Upon receipt we will update our database accordingly.

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I have submitted my application, what happens next?

Users of the Applicant Portal will instantly receive an acknowledgement email containing the request number as soon as the application has been submitted over the Applicant Portal.
For submissions of applications via email and provided that the application is complete, we will acknowledge receipt within two working days and provide you with the EASA project number.

As soon as your project has been allocated either to an EASA PCM or externally, you will receive the EASA Acceptance Letter providing you with the contact details of the PCM. The technical investigation may begin. Below please find the administrative milestones for your application:

 

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I am applying from a non-EASA Member State, what requirements are there?

A Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement (BASA) exists between EASA and the USA, Canada and Brazil and aims at the mutual acceptance of certificates.

As per the Technical Implementation Procedure (TIP) with the FAA (US) and TCCA (Canada), applicants applying to EASA have to submit their EASA application via their local FAA/TCCA office and request that their application be forwarded to EASA. The FAA/TCCA will forward the complete application package to EASA together with the FAA/TCCA concurrence letter. Applications that have not been forwarded via the FAA or the TCCA are considered incomplete and cannot be registered.

For further information on the TIP - FAA, click here.
For further information on the TIP - TCCA, click here.
For further information on the TIP - Brazil, click here.

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I am a US applicant, what are the benefits of the recent TIP revision 6?

Please note that TIP revision 6 has been published, please click here

This Revision of the TIP is the first milestone of the implementation of the validation improvement roadmap signed between EASA and FAA in February 2016. All design changes now have common approval path:

  • Accepted (The approval or certificate issued by the certifying authority are automatically accepted by the validating authority)
  • Streamlined validation (Basic) (The validating authority issues its certificate on the basis of the certificate issued by the certifying authority without technical involvement)
  • Technical Validation (non-Basic) (The technical validation is performed by the validating authority according to a work plan focused on safety emphasis items)

This revision extends to all repair design their acceptance by the validating authority, removes the last restrictions to the acceptance of ETSO/TSO approvals and introduces the concept of Basic Type Certificates (limited to piston engines and propellers). It will enter into force 6 months after its signature on 22 September 2017 in order to train EASA and FAA personnel.

 

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I am a BASA applicant (US/CAN/BRAZIL), how do I use the EASA Applicant Portal?

The bilateral applicant will complete the application data in the Applicant Portal and press “Submit”.

The Applicant Portal will send an email to the applicant with the application data summary document (Application Acknowledgement, FO.APMAN.00046) attached to it.

The applicant forwards the document to their National Aviation Authority in lieu of a completed EASA application form.

Meanwhile, EASA will change the application status in the Applicant Portal to “Waiting for FWD Letter – Eligibility Check” .

The National Aviation Authority reviews the application and forwards it together with the forwarding letter to EASA.

EASA performs the full eligibility check and, if applicable, changes the application status in the Applicant Portal to “Registered”. 

The technical checks and investigation can start upon formal EASA acceptance.

 

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Can a US applicant use the EASA Applicant Portal?

The US applicant can indeed submit the application online to EASA via the portal. 

An online application document is then generated, which replaces the current application forms as you know them.

In order to stay in line with the bilateral procedures, the US applicant will send the online application document together with the requested data for the validation request to the responsible FAA ACO which will forward the complete validation request to EASA along with the FAA concurrence letter. 

EASA ensures that only once the FAA letter is received along with the application summary document and the requested data for the validation request, EASA will further proceed with the application registration. 
The EASA Applicant Portal simply logs the application, which is held pending until the FAA has reviewed the application and provided EASA with a concurrence letter. It is not required for US applicants to upload supporting documents for the validation request to the EASA Applicant Portal.

The EASA Applicant Portal is currently set up to only provide the applicant with an acknowledgement message, not the FAA. As can be seen in the illustration, it is incumbent on the US applicant to actually notify the responsible FAA ACO of their EASA application by providing the online application document to the FAA. Once notified by the applicant themselves, FAA can initiate the review of their submission and only then can the FAA provide EASA with the required concurrence letter.

Once EASA receives the FAA concurrence letter, which confirms that the FAA has conducted their review of the application, only then will EASA perform their full eligibility check of the application, and once eligible, the EASA task number is assigned and the technical checks and investigation will start.

For further information, please consult the extensive EASA Portal user guide

The purpose of this message is to clarify to FAA certification staff and US applicants the use of the new EASA Applicant Portal

The new EASA portal is an alternative to the previous procedure of having to use MS-Word forms when submitting applications for design approval to EASA.

Applicants can easily register to the EASA Applicant Portal by sending a simple email to Applicant [dot] Portal [at] easa [dot] europa [dot] eu.

Please find below an explanatory note on how the submittal process for US applicants works in order to stay in line with TIP procedures:

While the MS-Word forms are still acceptable, online submittal of applications over the Applicant Portal is now the preferred method by EASA for receiving applications.

The overall application process to EASA under the TIP remains essentially the same.

 

 

 

 

 

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Can a Canadian applicant use the EASA Applicant Portal?

The new EASA portal was introduced under TIP Rev. 2. It is an alternative to the previous procedure of having to use MS-Word forms when submitting applications for design approval to EASA. The applicable TIP provision citing use of the Application portal is provided below:

2.3.1 Submission of an Application
(a)………..

(i) For EASA: Application Forms

Questions have been raised, suggesting the new on-line portal deviates from the TIP procedures that requires TCCA office submit the application to EASA. Use of the new EASA Application portal puts the applicant directly “submitting” an application before TCCA has the chance to review and endorse such application.

You will find below an illustration explaining the process and sequence of the new portal. The use of the new portal (which is an on-line application) replaces the previous filling of MS-Word form. Once the on-line application is filed, the Canadian applicant will receive an acknowledgement message that an application has been filled. This on-line application will not be processed yet nor validated outright. It simply logs it, and is held pending until such time TCCA has reviewed the application and provided EASA with a forwarding letter.

The EASA Applicant Portal is currently set up to provide the applicant only with an acknowledgement message, and not the TCCA. As can be seen in the illustration, it is incumbent on the Canadian applicant to actually notify TCCA of their EASA application by providing the Applicant Data Summary (FO.APMAN.00046) to TCCA. Once notified by the applicant themselves, TCCA can initiate the review of their submission and only then can TCCA provide EASA with the required forwarding letter.

Once EASA receives the TCCA forwarding letter, which confirms TCCA has conducted their review of the application, only then will EASA perform their full eligibility check of the application, and once eligible the EASA task number is assigned and the technical checks and investigation started.

The EASA Portal guide can be accessed at the following link: EASA Portal guide

If a Canadian applicant elects to use the MS-Word forms, the forms cannot be electronically submitted via the portal. The MS-Word forms have to be filled by the applicant and a copy submitted to TCCA, who in turn will file the application to EASA. While the MS-Word Forms are still acceptable, EASA prefers the transition to using the on-line application portal due to the efficiencies brought to the process (drop down boxes ensure the correctness of Applicant information, EASA product list, etc.).

The new Applicant Portal requires our applicant to notify TCCA that they have filed an application to EASA that without such notification, their application will not be processed further by EASA.
The overall application process to EASA under the TIP remains essentially the same.

 

 

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Am I eligible to apply for an STC, Major Change or Minor/Major Change to STC?

Major Change approvals can only be applied for by the Type Certificate holder.

For minor or major changes to an existing STC only the STC holder is eligible to apply (EASA FO.CERT.00031 and FO.CERT.00032).
Alternatively, you may apply for your own STC using EASA form FO.CERT.00033 but need to demonstrate part 21 eligibility i.e. be a Design Organisation Approval holder if you are an EASA Member State applicant. Alternatively, you may contact a DOA of your choice.
Part 21.A.14(c) provides the possibility for any natural person to apply for an STC on an ELA 1 aircraft by demonstrating capability through a certification programme. Alternative procedures are not necessary. ELA 1 is generally defined as aircraft with a max MTOW of 1200kg or less, including balloons up to 3400m^3 and sailplanes.

ELA1
ELA1 aircraft’ means the following manned European Light Aircraft:
ELA2
ELA2 aircraft’ means the following manned European Light Aircraft:

an aeroplane with a Maximum Take-off Mass (MTOM) of 1 200 kg or less that is not classified as complex motor-powered aircraft

an aeroplane with a Maximum Take-off Mass (MTOM) of 2 000 kg or less that is not classified as complex motor-powered aircraft

a sailplane or powered sailplane of 1 200 kg MTOM or less

a sailplane or powered sailplane of 2 000 kg MTOM or less

a balloon with a maximum design lifting gas or hot air volume of not more than 3 400 m 3 for hot air balloons, 1 050 m 3 for gas balloons, 300 m 3 for tethered gas balloons

a balloon

an airship designed for not more than 4 occupants and a maximum design lifting gas or hot air volume of not more than 3 400 m 3 for hot air airships and 1 000 m 3 for gas airships6

a hot air airship

 

a gas airship complying with all of the following characteristics: 

- 3% maximum static heaviness

- Non-vectored thrust (except reverse thrust)

- Conventional and simple design of: structure, control system and ballonet system

- Non-power assisted controls

 

a Very Light Rotorcraft

 

Certification Programme
Demonstration of capability via a certification programme for:
AP DOA
Demonstration of capability via AP DOA for:

ELA1 aircraft

ELA2 aircraft

Engine [to be] installed in ELA1 aircraft

Engine [to be] installed in ELA2 aircraft

Propeller [to be] installed in ELA1 aircraft

Propeller [to be] installed in ELA2 aircraft

Piston Engine

Fixed or adjustable pitch propeller 

Non-EU applicants do not need to demonstrate part 21 eligibility if a Bilateral Agreement/Working Arrangement is in force. 

For further information on Design Organisation Approval (DOA) and Alternative Procedure for Design Organisation Approval (AP DOA), please refer to the following FAQs.

 

 

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