NCO.IDE.A.100 Instruments and equipment – general

Regulation (EU) 2019/13842019/1384

(a) Instruments and equipment required by this Subpart shall be approved in accordance with the applicable airworthiness requirements if they are:

(1) used by the flight crew to control the flight path;

(2) used to comply with NCO.IDE.A.190;

(3) used to comply with NCO.IDE.A.195; or

(4) installed in the aeroplane.

(b) The following items, when required under this Subpart, do not need an equipment approval:

(1) spare fuses;

(2) independent portable lights;

(3) an accurate time piece;

(4) first-aid kit;

(5) survival and signalling equipment;

(6) sea anchor and equipment for mooring;

(7) child restraint device;

(8) a simple PCDS used by a task specialist as a restraint device.

(c) Instruments and equipment not required under Annex VII (Part-NCO) as well as any other equipment that is not required under this Regulation, but is carried on a flight, shall comply with the following requirements:

(1) the information provided by those instruments or equipment shall not be used by the flight crew members to comply with Annex II to Regulation (EU) 2018/1139 or points NCO.IDE.A.190  and NCO.IDE.A.195 of Annex VII;

(2) the instruments and equipment shall not affect the airworthiness of the aeroplane, even in the case of failures or malfunction.

(d) Instruments and equipment shall be readily operable or accessible from the station where the flight crew member that needs to use it is seated.

(e) All required emergency equipment shall be easily accessible for immediate use.

APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS

The applicable airworthiness requirements for approval of instruments and equipment required by this Part are the following:

(a) Regulation (EU) No 748/201287 Commission Regulation (EU) No 748/2012 of 3 August 2012 laying down implementing rules for the airworthiness and environmental certification of aircraft and related products, parts and appliances, as well as for the certification of design and production organisations, OJ L 224, 21.8.2012, p. 1. for aeroplanes registered in the EU; and

(b) Airworthiness requirements of the State of registry for aeroplanes registered outside the EU.

REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS

The functionality of non-installed instruments and equipment required by this Subpart and that do not need an equipment approval, as listed in NCO.IDE.A.100(b), should be checked against recognised industry standards appropriate to the intended purpose. The operator is responsible for ensuring the maintenance of these instruments and equipment.

NOT REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT THAT DO NOT NEED TO BE APPROVED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPLICABLE AIRWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS, BUT ARE CARRIED ON A FLIGHT

(a) The provision of this paragraph does not exempt any installed instrument or item of equipment from complying with the applicable airworthiness requirements. In this case, the installation should be approved as required in the applicable airworthiness requirements and should comply with the applicable Certification Specifications.

(b) The failure of additional non-installed instruments or equipment not required by this Part or by the applicable airworthiness requirements or any applicable airspace requirements should not adversely affect the airworthiness and/or the safe operation of the aeroplane. Examples may be the following:

(1) portable electronic flight bag (EFB);

(2) portable electronic devices carried by crew members; and

(3) non-installed passenger entertainment equipment.

NCO.IDE.A.105 Minimum equipment for flight

Regulation (EU) No 800/2013

A flight shall not be commenced when any of the aeroplane instruments, items of equipment or functions required for the intended flight are inoperative or missing, unless:

(a) the aeroplane is operated in accordance with the MEL, if established; or

(b) the aeroplane is subject to a permit to fly issued in accordance with the applicable airworthiness requirements.

MANAGEMENT OF THE STATUS OF CERTAIN INSTRUMENTS, EQUIPMENT OR FUNCTIONS

The operator should control and retain the status of the instruments, equipment or functions required for the intended operation, that are not controlled for the purpose of continuing airworthiness management.

MANAGEMENT OF THE STATUS OF CERTAIN INSTRUMENTS, EQUIPMENT OR FUNCTIONS

(a) The operator should define responsibilities and procedures to retain and control the status of instruments, equipment or functions required for the intended operation, that are not controlled for the purpose of continuing airworthiness management.

(b) Examples of such instruments, equipment or functions may be, but are not limited to, equipment related to navigation approvals as FM immunity or certain software versions.

NCO.IDE.A.110 Spare electrical fuses

Regulation (EU) No 800/2013

Aeroplanes shall be equipped with spare electrical fuses, of the ratings required for complete circuit protection, for replacement of those fuses that are allowed to be replaced in flight.

FUSES

A spare electrical fuse means a replaceable fuse in the flight crew compartment, not an automatic circuit breaker or circuit breakers in the electric compartments.

NCO.IDE.A.115 Operating lights

Regulation (EU) No 800/2013

Aeroplanes operated at night shall be equipped with:

(a) an anti-collision light system;

(b) navigation/position lights;

(c) a landing light;

(d) lighting supplied from the aeroplane’s electrical system to provide adequate illumination for all instruments and equipment essential to the safe operation of the aeroplane;

(e) lighting supplied from the aeroplane’s electrical system to provide illumination in all passenger compartments;

(f) an independent portable light for each crew member station; and

(g) lights to conform with the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea if the aeroplane is operated as a seaplane.

NCO.IDE.A.120 Operations under VFR – flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment

Regulation (EU) 2019/13842019/1384

(a) Aeroplanes operated under VFR by day shall be equipped with a means of measuring and displaying the following:

(1) magnetic heading;

(2) time, in hours, minutes and seconds;

(3) barometric altitude;

(4) indicated airspeed; and

(5) Mach number, whenever speed limitations are expressed in terms of Mach number.

(b) Aeroplanes operated under visual meteorological conditions (VMC) at night, or in conditions where the aeroplane cannot be maintained in a desired flight path without reference to one or more additional instruments, shall be, in addition to (a), equipped with:

(1) a means of measuring and displaying the following:

(i) turn and slip;

(ii) attitude;

(iii) vertical speed; and

(iv) stabilised heading;

and

(2) a means of indicating when the supply of power to the gyroscopic instruments is not adequate.

(c) Aeroplanes operated in conditions where they cannot be maintained in a desired flight path without reference to one or more additional instruments, shall be, in addition to (a) and (b), equipped with a means of preventing malfunction of the airspeed indicating system required in (a)(4) due to condensation or icing.

INTEGRATED INSTRUMENTS

(a) Individual equipment requirements may be met by combinations of instruments, by integrated flight systems or by a combination of parameters on electronic displays. The information so available to each required pilot should not be less than that required in the applicable operational requirements, and the equivalent safety of the installation should be approved during type certification of the aeroplane for the intended type of operation.

(b) The means of measuring and indicating turn and slip, aeroplane attitude and stabilised aeroplane heading may be met by combinations of instruments or by integrated flight director systems, provided that the safeguards against total failure, inherent in the three separate instruments, are retained.

LOCAL FLIGHTS

For flights that do not exceed 60 minutes duration, that take off and land at the same aerodrome, and that remain within 50 NM of that aerodrome, an equivalent means of complying with NCO.IDE.A.120(b)(1)(i), (b)(1)(ii) may be:

(a) a turn and slip indicator;

(b) a turn co-ordinator; or

(c) both an attitude indicator and a slip indicator.

SLIP INDICATION

Aeroplanes should be equipped with a means of measuring and displaying slip.

NCO.IDE.A.125 Operations under IFR – flight and navigational instruments and associated equipment

Regulation (EU) 2019/13842019/1384

Aeroplanes operated under IFR shall be equipped with:

(a) a means of measuring and displaying the following:

(1) magnetic heading;

(2) time in hours, minutes and seconds;

(3) barometric altitude;

(4) indicated airspeed;

(5) vertical speed;

(6) turn and slip;

(7) attitude;

(8) stabilised heading;

(9) outside air temperature; and

(10) Mach number, whenever speed limitations are expressed in terms of Mach number;

(b) a means of indicating when the supply of power to the gyroscopic instruments is not adequate; and

(c) a means of preventing malfunction of the airspeed indicating system required in (a)(4) due to condensation or icing.

ALTERNATE SOURCE OF STATIC PRESSURE

Aeroplanes should be equipped with an alternate source of static pressure.

MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING MAGNETIC HEADING

The means of measuring and displaying magnetic direction should be a magnetic compass or equivalent.

MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING THE TIME

A means of measuring and displaying the time in hours, minutes and seconds may be a wrist watch capable of the same functions.

CALIBRATION OF THE MEANS OF MEASURING AND DISPLAYING PRESSURE ALTITUDE

The instrument measuring and displaying barometric altitude should be of a sensitive type calibrated in feet (ft), with a sub-scale setting, calibrated in hectopascals/millibars, adjustable for any barometric pressure likely to be set during flight.

ALTIMETERS

Altimeters with counter drum-pointer or equivalent presentation are considered to be less susceptible to misinterpretation for aeroplanes operating above 10 000 ft.

CALIBRATION OF THE INSTRUMENT INDICATING AIRSPEED

(a) The instrument indicating airspeed should be calibrated in knots (kt).

(b) In the case of aeroplanes with a maximum certified take-off mass (MCTOM) below 2 000 kg, calibration in kilometres per hour (kph) or in miles per hour (mph) is acceptable when such units are used in the AFM.

MEANS OF PREVENTING MALFUNCTION DUE TO CONDENSATION OR ICING

The means of preventing malfunction due to either condensation or icing of the airspeed indicating system should be a heated pitot tube or equivalent.

 MEANS OF DISPLAYING OUTSIDE AIR TEMPERATURE

(a) The means of displaying outside air temperature should be calibrated in degrees Celsius.

(b) In the case of aeroplanes with a maximum certified take-off mass (MCTOM) below 2 000 kg, calibration in degrees Fahrenheit is acceptable, when such unit is used in the AFM.

(c) The means of displaying outside air temperature may be an air temperature indicator that provides indications that are convertible to outside air temperature.

NCO.IDE.A.130 Terrain awareness warning system (TAWS)

Regulation (EU) No 800/2013

Turbine-powered aeroplanes certified for a maximum passenger seating configuration of more than nine shall be equipped with a TAWS that meets the requirements for:

(a) class A equipment, as specified in an acceptable standard, in the case of aeroplanes for which the individual certificate of airworthiness (CofA) was first issued after 1 January 2011; or

(b) class B equipment, as specified in an acceptable standard, in the case of aeroplanes for which the individual CofA was first issued on or before 1 January 2011.

EXCESSIVE DOWNWARDS GLIDESLOPE DEVIATION WARNING FOR CLASS A TAWS

The requirement for a Class A TAWS to provide a warning to the flight crew for excessive downwards glideslope deviation should apply to all final approach glideslopes with angular vertical navigation (VNAV) guidance, whether provided by the instrument landing system (ILS), microwave landing system (MLS), satellite-based augmentation system approach procedure with vertical guidance (SBAS APV (localiser performance with vertical guidance approach LPV)), ground-based augmentation system (GBAS (GPS landing system, GLS)) or any other systems providing similar guidance. The same requirement should not apply to systems providing vertical guidance based on barometric VNAV.

ACCEPTABLE STANDARD FOR TAWS

An acceptable standard for Class A and Class B TAWS may be the applicable European Technical Standards Order (ETSO) issued by the Agency or equivalent.

NCO.IDE.A.135 Flight crew interphone system

Regulation (EU) No 800/2013

Aeroplanes operated by more than one flight crew member shall be equipped with a flight crew interphone system, including headsets and microphones for use by all flight crew members.

GENERAL

(a) The flight crew interphone system should not be of a handheld type.

(b) A headset consists of a communication device that includes two earphones to receive and a microphone to transmit audio signals to the aeroplane’s communication system. To comply with the minimum performance requirements, the earphones and microphone should match the communication system’s characteristics and the flight crew compartment environment. The headset should be adequately adjustable in order to fit the pilot’s head. Headset boom microphones should be of the noise cancelling type.

(c) If the intention is to utilise noise cancelling earphones, the pilot-in-command should ensure that the earphones do not attenuate any aural warnings or sounds necessary for alerting the flight crew on matters related to the safe operation of the aeroplane.

HEADSET

The term ‘headset’ includes any aviation helmet incorporating headphones and microphone worn by a flight crew member.

NCO.IDE.A.140 Seats, seat safety belts, restraint systems and child restraint devices

Regulation (EU) 2019/1384

 (a) Aeroplanes shall be equipped with:

(1) a seat or berth for each person on board who is aged 24 months or more;

(2) a seat belt on each seat and restraining belts for each berth;

(3) a child restraint device (CRD) for each person on board younger than 24 months; and

(4) a seat belt with upper torso restraint system on each flight crew seat, having a single point release for aeroplanes having a CofA first issued on or after 25 August 2016.

CHILD RESTRAINT DEVICES (CRDs)

(a) A CRD is considered to be acceptable if:

(1) it is a supplementary loop belt manufactured with the same techniques and the same materials as the approved safety belts; or

(2) it complies with (b).

(b) Provided the CRD can be installed properly on the respective aircraft seat, the following CRDs are considered acceptable:

(1) CRDs approved for use in aircraft according to the European Technical Standard Order ETSO-C100c on Aviation Child Safety Device (ACSD);

(2) CRDs approved by EASA through a Type Certificate or Supplemental Type Certificate;

(3) Child seats approved for use in motor vehicles on the basis of the technical standard specified in (i). The child seat must be also approved for use in aircraft on the basis of the technical standard specified in either point (ii) or point (iii):

(i) UN Standard ECE R44-04 (or 03), or ECE R129 bearing the respective ‘ECE R’ label; and

(ii) German ‘Qualification Procedure for Child Restraint Systems for Use in Aircraft’ (TÜV/958-01/2001) bearing the label ‘For Use in Aircraft’; or

(iii)  Other technical standard acceptable to the competent authority. The child seat should hold a qualification sign that it can be used in aircraft.

(4) Child seats approved for use in motor vehicles and aircraft according to Canadian CMVSS 213/213.1 bearing the respective label;

(5) Child seats approved for use in motor vehicles and aircraft according to US FMVSS No 213 and bearing one or two labels displaying the following two sentences:

(i) ‘THIS CHILD RESTRAINT SYSTEM CONFORMS TO ALL APPLICABLE FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS’; and

(ii) in red letters ‘THIS RESTRAINT IS CERTIFIED FOR USE IN MOTOR VEHICLES AND AIRCRAFT’;

(6) Child seats approved for use in motor vehicles and aircraft according to Australia/New Zealand’s technical standard AS/NZS 1754:2013 bearing the green part on the label displaying ‘For Use in Aircraft’; and

(7) CRDs manufactured and tested according to other technical standards equivalent to those listed above. The devices should be marked with an associated qualification sign, which shows the name of the qualification organisation and a specific identification number, related to the associated qualification project. The qualifying organisation should be a competent and independent organisation that is acceptable to the competent authority.

(c) Location

(1) Forward-facing child seats may be installed on both forward-and rearward-facing passenger seats, but only when fitted in the same direction as the passenger seat on which they are positioned. Rearward-facing child seats should only be installed on forward-facing passenger seats. A child seat may not be installed within the radius of action of an airbag unless it is obvious that the airbag is de-activated or it can be demonstrated that there is no negative impact from the airbag.

(2) An infant/child in a CRD should be located in the vicinity of a floor level exit.

(3) An infant/child in a CRD should not hinder evacuation for any passenger.

(d) Installation

(1) CRDs tested and approved for use in aircraft should only be installed on a suitable passenger seat by the method shown in the manufacturer’s instructions provided with each CRD and with the type of connecting device they are approved for the installation in aircraft. CRDs designed to be installed only by means of rigid bar lower anchorages (ISOFIX or equivalent) should only be used on passenger seats equipped with such connecting devices and should not be secured by passenger seat lap belt.

(2) All safety and installation instructions should be followed carefully by the responsible adult accompanying the infant/child. Operators should prohibit the use of a CRD not installed on the passenger seat according to the manufacturer’s instructions or not approved for use in aircraft.

(3) If a forward-facing child seat with a rigid backrest is to be fastened by a seat lap belt, the restraint device should be fastened when the backrest of the passenger seat on which it rests is in a reclined position. Thereafter, the backrest is to be positioned upright. This procedure ensures better tightening of the child seat on the aircraft seat if the aircraft seat is reclinable.

(4) The buckle of the adult safety belt should be easily accessible for both opening and closing, and should be in line with the seat belt halves (not canted) after tightening.

(5) Forward-facing restraint devices with an integral harness must not be installed such that the adult safety belt is secured over the infant.

(e) Operation

(1) Each CRD should remain secured to a passenger seat during all phases of flight unless it is properly stowed when not in use.

(2) Where a child seat is adjustable in recline, it should be in an upright position for all occasions when passenger restraint devices are required.

UPPER TORSO RESTRAINT SYSTEM

(a) The following systems are deemed to be compliant with the requirement for an upper torso restraint system:

(1) A seat belt with a diagonal shoulder strap;

(2) A restraint system having a seat belt and two shoulder straps that may be used independently;

(3) A restraint system having a seat belt, two shoulder straps and additional straps that may be used independently.

(b) The use of the upper torso restraint independently from the use of the seat belt is intended as an option for the comfort of the occupant of the seat in those phases of flight where only the seat belt is required to be fastened. A restraint system including a seat belt and an upper torso restraint that both remain permanently fastened is also acceptable.

SEAT BELT

A seat belt with a diagonal shoulder strap (three anchorage points) is deemed to be compliant with the requirement for a seat belt (two anchorage points).

NCO.IDE.A.145 First-aid kit

Regulation (EU) No 800/2013

(a) Aeroplanes shall be equipped with a first-aid kit.

(b) The first-aid kit shall be:

(1) readily accessible for use; and

(2) kept up-to-date.

CONTENT OF FIRST-AID KITS

(a) First-aid kits should be equipped with appropriate and sufficient medications and instrumentation. However, these kits should be supplemented by the operator according to the characteristics of the operation (scope of operation, flight duration, number and demographics of passengers, etc.).

(b) The following should be included in the FAKs:

(1) bandages (assorted sizes, including a triangular bandage),

(2) burns dressings (large and small),

(3) wound dressings (large and small),

(4) adhesive dressings (assorted sizes),

(5) antiseptic wound cleaner,

(6) safety scissors,

(7) disposable gloves,

(8)  disposable resuscitation aid, and

(9) surgical masks.

MAINTENANCE OF FIRST-AID KIT

To be kept up-to-date, the first-aid kit should be:

(a) inspected periodically to confirm, to the extent possible, that contents are maintained in the condition necessary for their intended use;

(b) replenished at regular intervals, in accordance with instructions contained on their labels, or as circumstances warrant; and

(c) replenished after use in-flight at the first opportunity where replacement items are available.

GM1 NCO.IDE.A.145 First-aid kit

ED Decision 2021/005/R

LOCATION

The location of the first-aid kit in the cabin is normally indicated using internationally recognisable signs.

GM2 NCO.IDE.A.145 First-aid kit

ED Decision 2021/005/R

CONTENT OF FIRST-AID KITS

The operator may supplement first-aid kits according to the characteristics of the operation based on a risk assessment. The assessment does not require an approval by the competent authority.

NCO.IDE.A.150 Supplemental oxygen – pressurised aeroplanes

Regulation (EU) No 800/2013

(a) Pressurised aeroplanes operated at flight altitudes for which the oxygen supply is required in accordance with (b) shall be equipped with oxygen storage and dispensing apparatus capable of storing and dispensing the required oxygen supplies.

(b) Pressurised aeroplanes operated above flight altitudes at which the pressure altitude in the passenger compartments is above 10 000 ft shall carry enough breathing oxygen to supply:

(1) all crew members and:

(i) 100 % of the passengers for any period when the cabin pressure altitude exceeds 15 000 ft, but in no case less than 10 minutes’ supply;

(ii) at least 30 % of the passengers, for any period when, in the event of loss of pressurisation and taking into account the circumstances of the flight, the pressure altitude in the passenger compartment will be between 14 000 ft and 15 000 ft; and

(iii) at least 10 % of the passengers for any period in excess of 30 minutes when the pressure altitude in the passenger compartment will be between 10 000 ft and 14 000 ft;

and

(2) all the occupants of the passenger compartment for no less than 10 minutes, in the case of aeroplanes operated at pressure altitudes above 25 000 ft, or operated below that altitude but under conditions that will not allow them to descend safely to a pressure altitude of 13 000 ft within 4 minutes.

(c) Pressurised aeroplanes operated at flight altitudes above 25 000 ft shall, in addition, be equipped with a device to provide a warning indication to the flight crew of any loss of pressurisation.

DETERMINATION OF OXYGEN

(a) In the determination of the amount of oxygen for the routes to be flown, it is assumed that the aeroplane will descend in accordance with the emergency procedures specified in the AFM, without exceeding its operating limitations, to a flight altitude that will allow the flight to be completed safely (i.e. flight altitudes ensuring adequate terrain clearance, navigational accuracy, hazardous weather avoidance, etc.).

(b) The amount of oxygen should be determined on the basis of cabin pressure altitude, flight duration, and on the assumption that a cabin pressurisation failure will occur at the pressure altitude or point of flight that is most critical from the standpoint of oxygen need.

(c) Following a cabin pressurisation failure, the cabin pressure altitude should be considered to be the same as the aeroplane pressure altitude, unless it can be demonstrated to the competent authority that no probable failure of the cabin or pressurisation system will result in a cabin pressure altitude equal to the aeroplane pressure altitude. Under these circumstances, the demonstrated maximum cabin pressure altitude may be used as a basis for determination of oxygen supply.

NCO.IDE.A.155 Supplemental oxygen – non-pressurised aeroplanes

Regulation (EU) 2016/1119

Non-pressurised aeroplanes operated when an oxygen supply is required in accordance with NCO.OP.190 shall be equipped with oxygen storage and dispensing apparatus capable of storing and dispensing the required oxygen supplies.

DETERMINATION OF OXYGEN

(a) In the determination of the amount of oxygen for the routes to be flown, it is assumed that the aeroplane will operate at a flight altitude that will allow the flight to be completed safely (i.e. flight altitudes ensuring adequate terrain clearance, navigational accuracy, hazardous weather avoidance, etc.).

(b) The amount of oxygen should be determined on the basis of cabin pressure altitude and flight duration.

OXYGEN SUPPLY

The need for oxygen supply, when required by NCO.OP.190, may be met either by means of installed equipment or portable equipment.

NCO.IDE.A.160 Hand fire extinguishers

Regulation (EU) 2018/1975

(a) Aeroplanes, except ELA1 aeroplanes, shall be equipped with at least one hand fire extinguisher:

(1) in the flight crew compartment; and

(2) in each passenger compartment that is separate from the flight crew compartment, except if the compartment is readily accessible to the flight crew.

(b) The type and quantity of extinguishing agent for the required fire extinguishers shall be suitable for the type of fire likely to occur in the compartment where the extinguisher is intended to be used and to minimise the hazard of toxic gas concentration in compartments occupied by persons.

NCO.IDE.A.165 Marking of break-in points

Regulation (EU) No 800/2013

If areas of the aeroplane’s fuselage suitable for break-in by rescue crews in an emergency are marked, such areas shall be marked as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1

Marking of break-in points

MARKINGS — COLOUR AND CORNERS

(a) The colour of the markings should be red or yellow and, if necessary, should be outlined in white to contrast with the background.

(b) If the corner markings are more than 2 m apart, intermediate lines 9 cm x 3 cm should be inserted so that there is no more than 2 m between adjacent markings.

NCO.IDE.A.170 Emergency locator transmitter (ELT)

Regulation (EU) No 800/2013

(a) Aeroplanes shall be equipped with:

(1) an ELT of any type, when first issued with an individual CofA on or before 1 July 2008;

(2) an automatic ELT, when first issued with an individual CofA after 1 July 2008; or

(3) a survival ELT (ELT(S)) or a personal locator beacon (PLB), carried by a crew member or a passenger, when certified for a maximum passenger seating configuration of six or less.

(b) ELTs of any type and PLBs shall be capable of transmitting simultaneously on 121,5 MHz and 406 MHz.

BATTERIES

(a) All batteries used in ELTs or PLBs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is rechargeable) when the equipment has been in use for more than 1 cumulative hour or in the following cases:

(1) Batteries specifically designed for use in ELTs and having an airworthiness release certificate (EASA Form 1 or equivalent) should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is rechargeable) before the end of their useful life in accordance with the maintenance instructions applicable to the ELT.

(2) Standard batteries manufactured in accordance with an industry standard and not having an airworthiness release certificate (EASA Form 1 or equivalent), when used in ELTs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is rechargeable) when 50 % of their useful life (or for rechargeable, 50 % of their useful life of charge), as established by the battery manufacturer, has expired.

(3) All batteries used in PLBs should be replaced (or recharged, if the battery is rechargeable) when 50 % of their useful life (or for rechargeable, 50 % of their useful life of charge), as established by the battery manufacturer, has expired.

(4) The battery useful life (or useful life of charge) criteria in (1),(2) and (3) do not apply to batteries (such as water-activated batteries) that are essentially unaffected during probable storage intervals.

(b) The new expiry date for a replaced (or recharged) battery should be legibly marked on the outside of the equipment.

TYPES OF ELTs AND GENERAL TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

(a) The ELT required by this provision should be one of the following:

(1) Automatic fixed (ELT(AF)). An automatically activated ELT that is permanently attached to an aircraft and is designed to aid search and rescue (SAR) teams in locating the crash site.

(2) Automatic portable (ELT(AP)). An automatically activated ELT that is rigidly attached to an aircraft before a crash, but is readily removable from the aircraft after a crash. It functions as an ELT during the crash sequence. If the ELT does not employ an integral antenna, the aircraft-mounted antenna may be disconnected and an auxiliary antenna (stored on the ELT case) attached to the ELT. The ELT can be tethered to a survivor or a life-raft. This type of ELT is intended to aid SAR teams in locating the crash site or survivor(s).

(3) Automatic deployable (ELT(AD)). An ELT that is rigidly attached to the aircraft before the crash and that is automatically deployed and activated by an impact, and, in some cases, also by water sensors. This type of ELT should float in water and is intended to aid SAR teams in locating the crash site. The ELT(AD) may be either a stand-alone beacon or an inseparable part of a deployable recorder.

(4) Survival ELT (ELT(S)). An ELT that is removable from an aircraft, stowed so as to facilitate its ready use in an emergency and manually activated by a survivor. An ELT(S) may be activated manually or automatically (e.g. by water activation). It should be designed either to be tethered to a life-raft or a survivor. A water-activated ELT(S) is not an ELT(AP).

(b) To minimise the possibility of damage in the event of crash impact, the automatic ELT should be rigidly fixed to the aircraft structure, as far aft as is practicable, with its antenna and connections arranged so as to maximise the probability of the signal being transmitted after a crash.

(c) Any ELT carried should operate in accordance with the relevant provisions of ICAO Annex 10, Volume III, and should be registered with the national agency responsible for initiating search and rescue or other nominated agency.

PLB TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

(a) A personal locator beacon (PLB) should have a built-in GNSS receiver with a cosmicheskaya sistyema poiska avariynich sudov — search and rescue satellite-aided tracking (COSPAS-SARSAT) type approval number. However, devices with a COSPAS-SARSAT number belonging to series 700 are excluded as this series of numbers identifies the special-use beacons not meeting all the technical requirements and all the tests specified by COSPAS-SARSAT.

(b) Any PLB carried should be registered with the national agency responsible for initiating search and rescue or other nominated agency.

BRIEFING ON PLB USE

When a PLB is carried by a passenger, he/she should be briefed on its characteristics and use by the pilot-in-command before the flight.

TERMINOLOGY

GM1 CAT.IDE.A.280 contains explanations of terms used in point NCO.IDE.A.170 and in the related AMC.

NCO.IDE.A.175 Flight over water

Regulation (EU) No 800/2013

(a) The following aeroplanes shall be equipped with a life-jacket for each person on board, or equivalent individual floatation device for each person on board younger than 24 months, that shall be worn or stowed in a position that is readily accessible from the seat or berth of the person for whose use it is provided:

(1) single-engined landplanes when:

(i) flying over water beyond gliding distance from land; or

(ii) taking off or landing at an aerodrome or operating site where, in the opinion of the pilot-in-command, the take-off or approach path is so disposed over water that there would be a likelihood of a ditching;

(2) seaplanes operated over water; and

(3) aeroplanes operated at a distance away from land where an emergency landing is possible greater than that corresponding to 30 minutes at normal cruising speed or 50 NM, whichever is less.

(b) Seaplanes operated over water shall be equipped with:

(1) one anchor;

(2) one sea anchor (drogue), when necessary to assist in manoeuvring; and

(3) equipment for making the sound signals, as prescribed in the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, where applicable.

(c) The pilot-in-command of an aeroplane operated at a distance away from land where an emergency landing is possible greater than that corresponding to 30 minutes at normal cruising speed or 50 NM, whichever is the lesser, shall determine the risks to survival of the occupants of the aeroplane in the event of a ditching, based on which he/she shall determine the carriage of:

(1) equipment for making the distress signals;

(2) life-rafts in sufficient numbers to carry all persons on board, stowed so as to facilitate their ready use in emergency; and

(3) life-saving equipment, to provide the means of sustaining life, as appropriate to the flight to be undertaken.

ACCESSIBILITY OF LIFE-JACKETS

The life-jacket, if not worn, should be accessible from the seat or berth of the person for whose use it is provided, with a safety belt or a restraint system fastened.

MEANS OF ILLUMINATION FOR LIFE-JACKETS

Each life-jacket or equivalent individual flotation device should be equipped with a means of electric illumination for the purpose of facilitating the location of persons.

RISK ASSESSMENT

(a) When conducting the risk assessment, the pilot-in-command should base his/her decision, as far as is practicable, on the Implementing Rules and AMCs applicable to the operation of the aeroplane.

(b) The pilot-in-command should, for determining the risk, take the following operating environment and conditions into account:

(1) sea state;

(2) sea and air temperatures;

(3) the distance from land suitable for making an emergency landing; and

(4) the availability of search and rescue facilities.

SEAT CUSHIONS

Seat cushions are not considered to be flotation devices.

NCO.IDE.A.180 Survival equipment

Regulation (EU) No 800/2013

Aeroplanes operated over areas in which search and rescue would be especially difficult shall be equipped with such signalling devices and life-saving equipment, including means of sustaining life, as may be appropriate to the area overflown.

GENERAL

(a) Aeroplanes operated across land areas in which search and rescue would be especially difficult should be equipped with the following:

(1) signalling equipment to make the distress signals;

(2) at least one ELT(S) or a PLB, carried by the pilot-in-command or a passenger; and

(3) additional survival equipment for the route to be flown, taking account of the number of persons on board.

(b) The additional survival equipment specified in (a)(3) does not need to be carried when the aeroplane remains within a distance from an area where search and rescue is not especially difficult, that corresponds to:

(1) 120 minutes at one-engine-inoperative (OEI) cruising speed for aeroplanes capable of continuing the flight to an aerodrome with the critical engine(s) becoming inoperative at any point along the route or planned diversion routes; or

(2) 30 minutes at cruising speed for all other aeroplanes.

ADDITIONAL SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT

(a) The following additional survival equipment should be carried when required:

(1) 500 ml of water for each four, or fraction of four, persons on board;

(2) one knife;

(3) first-aid equipment; and

(4) one set of air/ground codes.

(b) If any item of equipment contained in the above list is already carried on board the aeroplane in accordance with another requirement, there is no need for this to be duplicated.

SIGNALLING EQUIPMENT

The signalling equipment for making distress signals is described in ICAO Annex 2, Rules of the Air.

AREAS IN WHICH SEARCH AND RESCUE WOULD BE ESPECIALLY DIFFICULT

The expression ‘areas in which search and rescue would be especially difficult’ should be interpreted, in this context, as meaning:

(a) areas so designated by the competent authority responsible for managing search and rescue; or

(b) areas that are largely uninhabited and where:

(1) the authority referred to in (a) has not published any information to confirm whether search and rescue would be or would not be especially difficult; and

(2) the authority referred to in (a) does not, as a matter of policy, designate areas as being especially difficult for search and rescue.

NCO.IDE.A.190 Radio communication equipment

Regulation (EU) No 800/2013

(a) Where required by the airspace being flown aeroplanes shall be equipped with radio communication equipment capable of conducting two-way communication with those aeronautical stations and on those frequencies to meet airspace requirements.

(b) Radio communication equipment, if required by (a), shall provide for communication on the aeronautical emergency frequency 121,5 MHz.

(c) When more than one communication equipment unit is required, each shall be independent of the other or others to the extent that a failure in any one will not result in failure of any other.

APPLICABLE AIRSPACE REQUIREMENTS

For aeroplanes being operated under European air traffic control, the applicable airspace requirements include the Single European Sky legislation.

NCO.IDE.A.195 Navigation equipment

Regulation (EU) 2019/13842019/1384

(a) Aeroplanes operated over routes that cannot be navigated by reference to visual landmarks shall be equipped with any navigation equipment necessary to enable them to proceed in accordance with:

(1) the ATS flight plan; if applicable; and

(2) the applicable airspace requirements.

(b) Aeroplanes shall have sufficient navigation equipment to ensure that, in the event of the failure of one item of equipment at any stage of the flight, the remaining equipment shall allow safe navigation in accordance with (a), or an appropriate contingency action, to be completed safely.

(c) Aeroplanes operated on flights in which it is intended to land in IMC shall be equipped with suitable equipment capable of providing guidance to a point from which a visual landing can be performed. This equipment shall be capable of providing such guidance for each aerodrome at which it is intended to land in IMC and for any designated alternate aerodromes.             

(d) For PBN operations the aircraft shall meet the airworthiness certification requirements for the appropriate navigation specification.

(e) Aeroplanes shall be equipped with surveillance equipment in accordance with the applicable airspace requirements.

NAVIGATION WITH VISUAL REFERENCE TO LANDMARKS

Where aeroplanes, with the surface in sight, can proceed according to the ATS flight plan by navigation with visual reference to landmarks, no additional equipment is needed to comply with NCO.IDE.A.195(a)(1).

AIRCRAFT ELIGIBILITY FOR PBN SPECIFICATION NOT REQUIRING SPECIFIC APPROVAL

(a) The performance of the aircraft is usually stated in the AFM/POH.

(b) Where such a reference cannot be found in the AFM/POH, other information provided by the aircraft manufacturer as TC holder, the STC holder or the design organisation having a privilege to approve minor changes may be considered.

(c) The following documents are considered acceptable sources of information:

(1) AFM/POH, supplements thereto, and documents directly referenced in the AFM/POH;

(2) FCOM or similar document;

(3) Service Bulletin or Service Letter issued by the TC holder or STC holder;

(4) approved design data or data issued in support of a design change approval;

(5) any other formal document issued by the TC or STC holders stating compliance with PBN specifications, AMC, Advisory Circulars (AC) or similar documents issued by the State of Design; and

(6) written evidence obtained from the State of Design.

(d) Equipment qualification data, in itself, is not sufficient to assess the PBN capabilities of the aircraft, since the latter depend on installation and integration.

(e) As some PBN equipment and installations may have been certified prior to the publication of the PBN Manual and the adoption of its terminology for the navigation specifications, it is not always possible to find a clear statement of aircraft PBN capability in the AFM/POH. However, aircraft eligibility for certain PBN specifications can rely on the aircraft performance certified for PBN procedures and routes prior to the publication of the PBN Manual.

(f) Below, various references are listed which may be found in the AFM/POH or other acceptable documents (see listing above) in order to consider the aircraft’s eligibility for a specific PBN specification if the specific term is not used.

(g) RNAV 5

(1) If a statement of compliance with any of the following specifications or standards is found in the acceptable documentation as listed above, the aircraft is eligible for RNAV 5 operations.

(i) B-RNAV;

(ii) RNAV 1;

(iii) RNP APCH;

(iv) RNP 4;

(v) A-RNP;

(vi) AMC 20-4;

(vii) JAA TEMPORARY GUIDANCE MATERIAL, LEAFLET NO. 2 (TGL 2);

(viii) JAA AMJ 20X2;

(ix) FAA AC 20-130A for en route operations;

(x) FAA AC 20-138 for en route operations; and

(xi) FAA AC 90-96.

(h) RNAV 1/RNAV 2

(1) If a statement of compliance with any of the following specifications or standards is found in the acceptable documentation as listed above, the aircraft is eligible for RNAV 1/RNAV 2 operations.

(i) RNAV 1;

(ii) PRNAV;

(iii) US RNAV type A;

(iv) FAA AC 20-138 for the appropriate navigation specification;

(v) FAA AC 90-100A;

(vi) JAA TEMPORARY GUIDANCE MATERIAL, LEAFLET NO. 10 Rev1 (TGL 10); and

(vii) FAA AC 90-100.

(2) However, if position determination is exclusively computed based on VOR-DME, the aircraft is not eligible for RNAV 1/RNAV 2 operations.

(i) RNP 1/RNP 2 continental

(1) If a statement of compliance with any of the following specifications or standards is found in the acceptable documentation as listed above, the aircraft is eligible for RNP 1/RNP 2 continental operations.

(i) A-RNP;

(ii) FAA AC 20-138 for the appropriate navigation specification; and

(iii) FAA AC 90-105.

(2) Alternatively, if a statement of compliance with any of the following specifications or standards is found in the acceptable documentation as listed above and position determination is primarily based on GNSS, the aircraft is eligible for RNP 1/RNP 2 continental operations. However, in these cases, loss of GNSS implies loss of RNP 1/RNP 2 capability.

(i) JAA TEMPORARY GUIDANCE MATERIAL, LEAFLET NO. 10 (TGL 10) (any revision); and

(ii) FAA AC 90-100.

(j) RNP APCH — LNAV minima

(1) If a statement of compliance with any of the following specifications or standards is found in the acceptable documentation as listed above, the aircraft is eligible for RNP APCH — LNAV operations.

(i) A-RNP;

(ii) AMC 20-27;

(iii) AMC 20-28;

(iv) FAA AC 20-138 for the appropriate navigation specification; and

(v) FAA AC 90-105 for the appropriate navigation specification.

(2) Alternatively, if a statement of compliance with RNP 0.3 GNSS approaches in accordance with any of the following specifications or standards is found in the acceptable documentation as listed above, the aircraft is eligible for RNP APCH — LNAV operations. Any limitation such as ‘within the US National Airspace’ may be ignored since RNP APCH procedures are assumed to meet the same ICAO criteria around the world.

(i) JAA TEMPORARY GUIDANCE MATERIAL, LEAFLET NO. 3 (TGL 3);

(ii) AMC 20-4;

(iii) FAA AC 20-130A; and

(iv) FAA AC 20-138.

(k) RNP APCH — LNAV/VNAV minima

(1) If a statement of compliance with any of the following specifications or standards is found in the acceptable documentation as listed above, the aircraft is eligible for RNP APCH — LNAV/VNAV operations.

(i) A-RNP;

(ii) AMC 20-27 with Baro VNAV;

(iii) AMC 20-28;

(iv) FAA AC 20-138; and

(v) FAA AC 90-105 for the appropriate navigation specification.

(2) Alternatively, if a statement of compliance with FAA AC 20-129 is found in the acceptable documentation as listed above, and the aircraft complies with the requirements and limitations of EASA SIB 2014-0488 http://ad.easa.europa.eu/ad/2014-04, the aircraft is eligible for RNP APCH — LNAV/VNAV operations. Any limitation such as ‘within the US National Airspace’ may be ignored since RNP APCH procedures are assumed to meet the same ICAO criteria around the world.

(l) RNP APCH — LPV minima

(1) If a statement of compliance with any of the following specifications or standards is found in the acceptable documentation as listed above, the aircraft is eligible for RNP APCH — LPV operations.

(i) AMC 20-28;

(ii) FAA AC 20-138 for the appropriate navigation specification; and

(iii) FAA AC 90-107.

(2) For aircraft that have a TAWS Class A installed and do not provide Mode-5 protection on an LPV approach, the DH is limited to 250 ft.

(m) RNAV 10

(1) If a statement of compliance with any of the following specifications or standards is found in the acceptable documentation as listed above, the aircraft is eligible for RNAV 10 operations.

(i) RNP 10;

(ii) FAA AC 20-138 for the appropriate navigation specification;

(iii) AMC 20-12;

(iv) FAA Order 8400.12 (or later revision); and

(v) FAA AC 90-105.

(n) RNP 4

(1) If a statement of compliance with any of the following specifications or standards is found in the acceptable documentation as listed above, the aircraft is eligible for RNP 4 operations.

(i) FAA AC 20-138B or later, for the appropriate navigation specification;

(ii) FAA Order 8400.33; and

(iii) FAA AC 90-105 for the appropriate navigation specification.

(o) RNP 2 oceanic

(1) If a statement of compliance with FAA AC 90-105 for the appropriate navigation specification is found in the acceptable documentation as listed above, the aircraft is eligible for RNP 2 oceanic operations.

(2) If the aircraft has been assessed eligible for RNP 4, the aircraft is eligible for RNP 2 oceanic.

(p) Special features

(1) RF in terminal operations (used in RNP 1 and in the initial segment of the RNP APCH)

(i) If a statement of demonstrated capability to perform an RF leg, certified in accordance with any of the following specifications or standards, is found in the acceptable documentation as listed above, the aircraft is eligible for RF in terminal operations.

(A) AMC 20-26; and

(B) FAA AC 20-138B or later.

(ii) If there is a reference to RF and a reference to compliance with AC 90-105, then the aircraft is eligible for such operations.

(q) Other considerations

(1) In all cases, the limitations in the AFM/POH need to be checked, in particular the use of AP or FD which can be required to reduce the FTE primarily for RNP APCH, RNAV 1, and RNP 1.

(2) Any limitation such as ‘within the US National Airspace’ may be ignored since RNP APCH procedures are assumed to meet the same ICAO criteria around the world.

GENERAL

(a) The PBN specifications for which the aircraft complies with the relevant airworthiness criteria are set out in the AFM/POH, together with any limitations to be observed.

(b) Because functional and performance requirements are defined for each navigation specification, an aircraft approved for an RNP specification is not automatically approved for all RNAV specifications. Similarly, an aircraft approved for an RNP or RNAV specification having a stringent accuracy requirement (e.g. RNP 0.3 specification) is not automatically approved for a navigation specification having a less stringent accuracy requirement (e.g. RNP 4).

RNP 4

(c) For RNP 4, at least two LRNSs, capable of navigating to RNP 4, and listed in the AFM/POH, may be operational at the entry point of the RNP 4 airspace. If an item of equipment required for RNP 4 operations is unserviceable, then the pilot-in-command may consider an alternate route or diversion for repairs. For multi-sensor systems, the AFM/POH may permit entry if one GNSS sensor is lost after departure, provided one GNSS and one inertial sensor remain available.

NCO.IDE.A.200 Transponder

Regulation (EU) No 800/2013

Where required by the airspace being flown, aeroplanes shall be equipped with a secondary surveillance radar (SSR) transponder with all the required capabilities. 

GENERAL

(a) The secondary surveillance radar (SSR) transponders of aeroplanes being operated under European air traffic control should comply with any applicable Single European Sky legislation.

(b) If the Single European Sky legislation is not applicable, the SSR transponders should operate in accordance with the relevant provisions of Volume IV of ICAO Annex 10.

NCO.IDE.A.205 Management of aeronautical databases

Regulation (EU) 2016/1119

(a) Aeronautical databases used on certified aircraft system applications shall meet data quality requirements that are adequate for the intended use of the data.

(b) The pilot-in-command shall ensure the timely distribution and insertion of current and unaltered aeronautical databases to the aircraft that require them.

(c) Notwithstanding any other occurrence reporting requirements as defined in Regulation (EU) No 376/2014, the pilot-in-command shall report to the database provider instances of erroneous, inconsistent or missing data that might be reasonably expected to constitute a hazard to flight.

In such cases, the pilot-in-command shall not use the affected data.

AERONAUTICAL DATABASES

When the operator of an aircraft uses an aeronautical database that supports an airborne navigation application as a primary means of navigation used to meet the airspace usage requirements, the database provider should be a Type 2 DAT provider certified in accordance with Regulation (EU) 2017/373 or equivalent.

AERONAUTICAL DATABASE APPLICATIONS

The certification of a Type 2 DAT provider in accordance with Regulation (EU) 2017/373 ensures data integrity and compatibility with the certified aircraft application/equipment.

TIMELY DISTRIBUTION

The operator should distribute current and unaltered aeronautical databases to all aircraft requiring them in accordance with the validity period of the databases or in accordance with an established procedure if no validity period is defined.

STANDARDS FOR AERONAUTICAL DATABASES AND DAT PROVIDERS

(a) A ‘Type 2 DAT provider’ is an organisation as defined in Article 2(5)(b) of Regulation (EU) 2017/373.

(b) Equivalent to a certified ‘Type 2 DAT provider’ is defined in any Aviation Safety Agreement between the European Union and a third country, including any Technical Implementation Procedures, or any Working Arrangements between EASA and the competent authority of a third country.